The Western Malayo-Polynesian Problem

The Western Malayo-Polynesian Problem <p>Abstract:</p><p>Since the 1970s, Austronesian higher-order subgrouping has often included a Western Malayo-Polynesian (WMP) node within the larger Malayo-Polyne- sian (MP) group. WMP includes all Malayo-Polynesian languages except for those in Central and Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, although today it is generally not accepted as a valid subgroup. This paper critically assesses WMP, using both linguistic and archaeological evidence. In conclusion, it is claimed that WMP is indeed invalid, and that in its place several primary branches of Malayo-Polynesian are recognized (Western Indonesian, Sumatran, Celebic, South Sulawesi, Chamorro, Palauan, and Moken), plus Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian and Philippines, which may represent either a collection of several yet unnamed primary branches or an innovation-defined linkage. Additionally, it is argued that the 6,750 Proto-WMP reconstructions in the <i>Austronesian comparative dictionary</i> must be reevaluated, where appropriate, as Proto-MP reconstructions.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

The Western Malayo-Polynesian Problem

Oceanic Linguistics, Volume 56 (2) – Nov 18, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Since the 1970s, Austronesian higher-order subgrouping has often included a Western Malayo-Polynesian (WMP) node within the larger Malayo-Polyne- sian (MP) group. WMP includes all Malayo-Polynesian languages except for those in Central and Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, although today it is generally not accepted as a valid subgroup. This paper critically assesses WMP, using both linguistic and archaeological evidence. In conclusion, it is claimed that WMP is indeed invalid, and that in its place several primary branches of Malayo-Polynesian are recognized (Western Indonesian, Sumatran, Celebic, South Sulawesi, Chamorro, Palauan, and Moken), plus Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian and Philippines, which may represent either a collection of several yet unnamed primary branches or an innovation-defined linkage. Additionally, it is argued that the 6,750 Proto-WMP reconstructions in the <i>Austronesian comparative dictionary</i> must be reevaluated, where appropriate, as Proto-MP reconstructions.</p>

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 18, 2017

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