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The Ways of Interpreting Dao

The Ways of Interpreting Dao Ruiqi Ma Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Chinese Department (Monterey, CA) Daodejing: The Book of the Way. By Laozi. Translation and Commentary by Moss Roberts. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 2001. Pp. ix þ 226. The Daodejing of Laozi. Translation and Commentary by Philip J. Ivanhoe. New York and London: Seven Bridges Press, 2002. Pp. xxxii þ 125. According to an old Chinese saying, ``Good things come in pairs.'' This is certainly true for Laozi studies in America since two new translations of the Daodejing offer contrasting yet complementary readings of this ancient Daoist canon: Moss Roberts' Daodejing: The Book of the Way, and Philip J. Ivanoe's The Daodejing of Laozi. The Daodejing is the most translated of the Chinese classics, and there are more than ``forty versions in English alone'' (Roberts, p. 9). What makes these two new translations stand out is the linguistic sensitivity and philosophical sophistication of both. Ludwig Wittgenstein once compared the complexity and multiplicity of language to a confusing ``ancient city'' with ``a maze of little streets and squares, of old and new houses, and of houses with additions from various periods.'' 1 Likewise, translating an ancient text http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Ways of Interpreting Dao

Philosophy East and West , Volume 56 (3) – Jul 20, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
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Abstract

Ruiqi Ma Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Chinese Department (Monterey, CA) Daodejing: The Book of the Way. By Laozi. Translation and Commentary by Moss Roberts. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 2001. Pp. ix þ 226. The Daodejing of Laozi. Translation and Commentary by Philip J. Ivanhoe. New York and London: Seven Bridges Press, 2002. Pp. xxxii þ 125. According to an old Chinese saying, ``Good things come in pairs.'' This is certainly true for Laozi studies in America since two new translations of the Daodejing offer contrasting yet complementary readings of this ancient Daoist canon: Moss Roberts' Daodejing: The Book of the Way, and Philip J. Ivanoe's The Daodejing of Laozi. The Daodejing is the most translated of the Chinese classics, and there are more than ``forty versions in English alone'' (Roberts, p. 9). What makes these two new translations stand out is the linguistic sensitivity and philosophical sophistication of both. Ludwig Wittgenstein once compared the complexity and multiplicity of language to a confusing ``ancient city'' with ``a maze of little streets and squares, of old and new houses, and of houses with additions from various periods.'' 1 Likewise, translating an ancient text

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 20, 2006

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