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The Way Things Are: Conversations with Huston Smith on the Spiritual Life (review)

The Way Things Are: Conversations with Huston Smith on the Spiritual Life (review) BOOK REVIEWS Islam, Judaism--indeed, of all religions--will clarify their perspectives over the summary comments at the hand of Dupuis and other Christian theologians. Religious Pluralism has indices of biblical citations and names but lacks an index of terms and ideas; Christianity and the Religions has a true index, which is much appreciated. Since Dupuis attempts to justify his theology of religions within the Christian theological tradition, Christianity has fewer references to Buddhism and to authors who write about Buddhist-Christian relations than the more comprehensive Religious Pluralism. Buddhists might prefer the earlier book. For Christian theologians, Christianity is Dupuis's final word on the matter, and they need to consult it. His comprehensive work in the end was not judged in error and this more precise follow-up volume is how he chose to restate his views with faithfulness and precision. John Borelli Georgetown University THE WAY THINGS ARE: CONVERSATIONS WITH HUSTON SMITH ON THE SPIRITUAL LIFE. Edited by Phil Cousineau. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. 314 + xxiv pp. A certain air of dialectical paradox hovers around the figure of Huston Smith, a seeming conjunction of opposites that constitute "Huston Smith," apprehended not so much as a real individual http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

The Way Things Are: Conversations with Huston Smith on the Spiritual Life (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 25 (1) – Oct 10, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Islam, Judaism--indeed, of all religions--will clarify their perspectives over the summary comments at the hand of Dupuis and other Christian theologians. Religious Pluralism has indices of biblical citations and names but lacks an index of terms and ideas; Christianity and the Religions has a true index, which is much appreciated. Since Dupuis attempts to justify his theology of religions within the Christian theological tradition, Christianity has fewer references to Buddhism and to authors who write about Buddhist-Christian relations than the more comprehensive Religious Pluralism. Buddhists might prefer the earlier book. For Christian theologians, Christianity is Dupuis's final word on the matter, and they need to consult it. His comprehensive work in the end was not judged in error and this more precise follow-up volume is how he chose to restate his views with faithfulness and precision. John Borelli Georgetown University THE WAY THINGS ARE: CONVERSATIONS WITH HUSTON SMITH ON THE SPIRITUAL LIFE. Edited by Phil Cousineau. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. 314 + xxiv pp. A certain air of dialectical paradox hovers around the figure of Huston Smith, a seeming conjunction of opposites that constitute "Huston Smith," apprehended not so much as a real individual

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2005

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