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The Way of the Dialetheist: Contradictions in Buddhism

The Way of the Dialetheist: Contradictions in Buddhism COMMENT AND DISCUSSION Yasuo Deguchi Kyoto University Jay L. Garfield Smith College, University of Melbourne, and Central Institute of Tibetan Studies Graham Priest Universities of Melbourne and St. Andrews Introduction Anyone who is accustomed to the view that contradictions cannot be true and cannot be accepted, and who reads texts in the Buddhist traditions, will be struck by the fact that these texts frequently contain contradictions. Just consider, for example: (1) Twenty years a pilgrim, Footing east and west. Back in Seiken, I've not moved an inch. (Seiken Chiju, Poem)1 (2) Who says my poetry is poetry? My poetry is not poetry. Provided you understand my poetry as not poetry Only then can we discourse together about poetry. (Ryokan, Poem)2 ¯ (3) What the realised one has described as the possession of distinctive features is itself the non-possession of distinctive features. (Vajracchedika 5)3 (4) The very same perfection of insight, Subhuti, which the realised one has preached is indeed perfectionless. (Vajracchedika 13b)4 (5) Furthermore, Subhuti, any perfection of acceptance the realised one has is indeed a nonperfection. (Vajracchedika 14e)5 (6) Everything is real and is not real, Both real and not real, Neither real nor not real. This http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Way of the Dialetheist: Contradictions in Buddhism

Philosophy East and West , Volume 58 (3) – Jul 16, 2008

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
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1529-1898
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Abstract

COMMENT AND DISCUSSION Yasuo Deguchi Kyoto University Jay L. Garfield Smith College, University of Melbourne, and Central Institute of Tibetan Studies Graham Priest Universities of Melbourne and St. Andrews Introduction Anyone who is accustomed to the view that contradictions cannot be true and cannot be accepted, and who reads texts in the Buddhist traditions, will be struck by the fact that these texts frequently contain contradictions. Just consider, for example: (1) Twenty years a pilgrim, Footing east and west. Back in Seiken, I've not moved an inch. (Seiken Chiju, Poem)1 (2) Who says my poetry is poetry? My poetry is not poetry. Provided you understand my poetry as not poetry Only then can we discourse together about poetry. (Ryokan, Poem)2 ¯ (3) What the realised one has described as the possession of distinctive features is itself the non-possession of distinctive features. (Vajracchedika 5)3 (4) The very same perfection of insight, Subhuti, which the realised one has preached is indeed perfectionless. (Vajracchedika 13b)4 (5) Furthermore, Subhuti, any perfection of acceptance the realised one has is indeed a nonperfection. (Vajracchedika 14e)5 (6) Everything is real and is not real, Both real and not real, Neither real nor not real. This

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 16, 2008

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