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The War on Heresy by R. I. Moore (review)

The War on Heresy by R. I. Moore (review) highlight the limits of Eurocentric perspectives and foci in the history of maritime Asia. Important questions remain, however. One wonders why, other than the problem of space, he excluded the Indian Ocean from this discussion. European preeminence in the Indian Ocean­Southeast Asian trade might have been a factor, although the discussions of the European expansions provide little analysis of commercial flows and movements. Is it also possible, therefore, to include South Asia within this "Oriental Mediterranean" connected by the sea? The chapter on Islam and Islamization does deal with the Indian Ocean, but focuses more on religious influence than commercial connections. Would a discussion of commercial flows in addition and in relation to the conventional Islamization narrative provide a rather different picture of Indian Ocean spaces? Could there have been a new maritime diplomatic exchange system emerging with Islamization and parallel to the East Asian tributary trade system? This book should be judged on its whole rather than its parts. It presents an important attempt at the writing of a world history from the Southeast Asian perspective. Specialists might be critical of the lack of in-depth analysis for each of the chapters and the very important themes they http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The War on Heresy by R. I. Moore (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 24 (3)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

highlight the limits of Eurocentric perspectives and foci in the history of maritime Asia. Important questions remain, however. One wonders why, other than the problem of space, he excluded the Indian Ocean from this discussion. European preeminence in the Indian Ocean­Southeast Asian trade might have been a factor, although the discussions of the European expansions provide little analysis of commercial flows and movements. Is it also possible, therefore, to include South Asia within this "Oriental Mediterranean" connected by the sea? The chapter on Islam and Islamization does deal with the Indian Ocean, but focuses more on religious influence than commercial connections. Would a discussion of commercial flows in addition and in relation to the conventional Islamization narrative provide a rather different picture of Indian Ocean spaces? Could there have been a new maritime diplomatic exchange system emerging with Islamization and parallel to the East Asian tributary trade system? This book should be judged on its whole rather than its parts. It presents an important attempt at the writing of a world history from the Southeast Asian perspective. Specialists might be critical of the lack of in-depth analysis for each of the chapters and the very important themes they

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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