Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Value of Solitude: The Ethics and Spirituality of Aloneness in Autobiography (review)

The Value of Solitude: The Ethics and Spirituality of Aloneness in Autobiography (review) 05-Reviews 12/5/05 9:33 AM Page 681 Reviews 681 John D. Barbour. The Value of Solitude: The Ethics and Spirituality of Alone- ness in Autobiography. Charlottesville: U of Virginia P, 2004. 240 pp. ISBN 0-8139-2288-7, $49.50. John D. Barbour’s The Value of Solitude bears a passing resemblance to a number of classic works on autobiography—James Olney’s Metaphors of the Self (1972), Karl Weintraub’s The Value of the Individual (1978), Robert Elbaz’s The Changing Nature of the Self (1987)—that wend a chronological way from canonical precursors to roughly contemporary examples. (Like many of his predecessors, Barbour visits the familiar voices of Augustine, Montaigne, and Rousseau, after which he charts a more personal course that takes him up to writers such as Annie Dillard, Thomas Merton, and Paul Auster.) For Barbour, however, this layout is not meant to trace a historical trajectory—of selfhood, of the genre of autobiography, or of the central con- cept invoked here, solitude. The author recognizes, certainly, that solitude has a history, and that its many incarnations are linked to cultural develop- ments and given social needs; nodding approvingly toward Charles Taylor’s Sources of the Self, he notes that solitude’s history cannot be separated from that, say, of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

The Value of Solitude: The Ethics and Spirituality of Aloneness in Autobiography (review)

Biography , Volume 28 (4) – Jan 9, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/the-value-of-solitude-the-ethics-and-spirituality-of-aloneness-in-HqufctyZbM
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

05-Reviews 12/5/05 9:33 AM Page 681 Reviews 681 John D. Barbour. The Value of Solitude: The Ethics and Spirituality of Alone- ness in Autobiography. Charlottesville: U of Virginia P, 2004. 240 pp. ISBN 0-8139-2288-7, $49.50. John D. Barbour’s The Value of Solitude bears a passing resemblance to a number of classic works on autobiography—James Olney’s Metaphors of the Self (1972), Karl Weintraub’s The Value of the Individual (1978), Robert Elbaz’s The Changing Nature of the Self (1987)—that wend a chronological way from canonical precursors to roughly contemporary examples. (Like many of his predecessors, Barbour visits the familiar voices of Augustine, Montaigne, and Rousseau, after which he charts a more personal course that takes him up to writers such as Annie Dillard, Thomas Merton, and Paul Auster.) For Barbour, however, this layout is not meant to trace a historical trajectory—of selfhood, of the genre of autobiography, or of the central con- cept invoked here, solitude. The author recognizes, certainly, that solitude has a history, and that its many incarnations are linked to cultural develop- ments and given social needs; nodding approvingly toward Charles Taylor’s Sources of the Self, he notes that solitude’s history cannot be separated from that, say, of

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 9, 2006

There are no references for this article.