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The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the 'Opening' of Japan (review)

The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the 'Opening' of Japan (review) journal of world history, march 2009 situation is made that much more interesting during the Tang, when multiple conceptions of Other were conceived by a Self that was itself in transition. paul fischer Indiana University The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the `Opening' of Japan. By ann jannetta. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2007. 264 pp. $45 (cloth). At first glance, the title of the book might sound a little bit astonishing. What, the reader might ask, does the history of a disease and its treatment have to do with the opening of Japan? But it is well chosen, because it raises curiosity and the reader will soon discover that it carries the central argument of the book: Physicians who adopted Dutch medical learning (Rangaku) and tried hard to introduce variolation and vaccination against smallpox into Japan--the ranpö physicians--at least after 1820 contributed decisively to intellectual, social, and political changes in the country. To use Jannetta's own words, Japan's ranpö physicians--the vaccinators--were "important agents of change" (p. 182). Faced with the extreme isolation of the Tokugawa government from the concerns of its society and the restrictively monopolized foreign policy resulting from the Tokugawa rulers' raison d'état, these physicians http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the 'Opening' of Japan (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 20 (1) – May 3, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

journal of world history, march 2009 situation is made that much more interesting during the Tang, when multiple conceptions of Other were conceived by a Self that was itself in transition. paul fischer Indiana University The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the `Opening' of Japan. By ann jannetta. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2007. 264 pp. $45 (cloth). At first glance, the title of the book might sound a little bit astonishing. What, the reader might ask, does the history of a disease and its treatment have to do with the opening of Japan? But it is well chosen, because it raises curiosity and the reader will soon discover that it carries the central argument of the book: Physicians who adopted Dutch medical learning (Rangaku) and tried hard to introduce variolation and vaccination against smallpox into Japan--the ranpö physicians--at least after 1820 contributed decisively to intellectual, social, and political changes in the country. To use Jannetta's own words, Japan's ranpö physicians--the vaccinators--were "important agents of change" (p. 182). Faced with the extreme isolation of the Tokugawa government from the concerns of its society and the restrictively monopolized foreign policy resulting from the Tokugawa rulers' raison d'état, these physicians

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 3, 2009

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