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The Unseen City: Anthropological Perspectives on Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (review)

The Unseen City: Anthropological Perspectives on Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (review) the contemporary pacific · 18:2 (2006) By using the Net, these émigré patriots abroad sought from all sides to understand and share their indigenous perceptions of what was happening among their largely illiterate and often voiceless wantoks (literally, "one talk"; relative or language group) at home. Thus, through e-mail, there was indigenous discussion throughout, even though mostly from a distance. It is very much to be hoped that these vigorous indigenous commentaries, a modern equivalent of "coconut radio" (gossip), has been preserved somehow, somewhere. With further in-depth interviewing of the real participants while they are still alive, the accumulated postings of that e-mail chat group could yet provide something more like a view from the inside. Meanwhile these two expatriate chronologies by Jon Fraenkel and Clive Moore, whether good histories, bad histories, or indeed "real" histories, are certainly the best published so far. They are indispensable summaries tracing how the Solomons fell so unexpectedly and so quickly from being a struggling near-nation to becoming a failed state. a self-fulfilling prophecy leading only to a further decline in local and business confidence as well as in law and order. Moore sees the peace-monitoring Operation Helpem Fren in July 2003 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Unseen City: Anthropological Perspectives on Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 18 (2) – Jul 27, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 18:2 (2006) By using the Net, these émigré patriots abroad sought from all sides to understand and share their indigenous perceptions of what was happening among their largely illiterate and often voiceless wantoks (literally, "one talk"; relative or language group) at home. Thus, through e-mail, there was indigenous discussion throughout, even though mostly from a distance. It is very much to be hoped that these vigorous indigenous commentaries, a modern equivalent of "coconut radio" (gossip), has been preserved somehow, somewhere. With further in-depth interviewing of the real participants while they are still alive, the accumulated postings of that e-mail chat group could yet provide something more like a view from the inside. Meanwhile these two expatriate chronologies by Jon Fraenkel and Clive Moore, whether good histories, bad histories, or indeed "real" histories, are certainly the best published so far. They are indispensable summaries tracing how the Solomons fell so unexpectedly and so quickly from being a struggling near-nation to becoming a failed state. a self-fulfilling prophecy leading only to a further decline in local and business confidence as well as in law and order. Moore sees the peace-monitoring Operation Helpem Fren in July 2003

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 27, 2006

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