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The Troubled Empire: China in the Yuan and Ming Dynasties (review)

The Troubled Empire: China in the Yuan and Ming Dynasties (review) building, monsoons, and navigation that people all across the ocean shared in common. Dhow Cultures is a well-argued book that examines the dynamic and long-term processes leading to the emergence of a truly global world of the Indian Ocean. This is undoubtedly a useful addition to the literature and will attract students and scholars interested in the aspects of society, economy, and culture of the East African Coast and of the Indian Ocean. The author succeeds in illuminating the significant role and position of the East African coast in the commercially and culturally integrated western Indian Ocean and in distinguishing the ocean as an arena of free and peaceful commerce and intensive sociocultural interaction. He questions the view that privileges the Europeans as being more advanced in navigational skills and shipbuilding techniques and technology than their Asian counterparts. He also challenges those scholars who discount or simply dismiss the impact of the Vasco da Gama epoch on the commercial culture of the Indian Ocean. The author is not explicit, but he does seem to suggest that with the Portuguese intervention of the early sixteenth century the Indian Ocean ceased to be a mare liberum, a major discontinuity indeed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Troubled Empire: China in the Yuan and Ming Dynasties (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (1) – Jun 15, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

building, monsoons, and navigation that people all across the ocean shared in common. Dhow Cultures is a well-argued book that examines the dynamic and long-term processes leading to the emergence of a truly global world of the Indian Ocean. This is undoubtedly a useful addition to the literature and will attract students and scholars interested in the aspects of society, economy, and culture of the East African Coast and of the Indian Ocean. The author succeeds in illuminating the significant role and position of the East African coast in the commercially and culturally integrated western Indian Ocean and in distinguishing the ocean as an arena of free and peaceful commerce and intensive sociocultural interaction. He questions the view that privileges the Europeans as being more advanced in navigational skills and shipbuilding techniques and technology than their Asian counterparts. He also challenges those scholars who discount or simply dismiss the impact of the Vasco da Gama epoch on the commercial culture of the Indian Ocean. The author is not explicit, but he does seem to suggest that with the Portuguese intervention of the early sixteenth century the Indian Ocean ceased to be a mare liberum, a major discontinuity indeed.

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 15, 2012

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