Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Troubled Empire: China in the Yuan and Ming Dynasties by Timothy Brook (review)

The Troubled Empire: China in the Yuan and Ming Dynasties by Timothy Brook (review) Reviews 215 effective use of the material. Brief explanations of items from “Who’s Who” and the glossary also appear in the margins of relevant text in the second edition, a handy resource for beginning learners. The thirty-two primary documents at the end of the book cover a wide range of topics including political campaigns, democratic movements, ethnic relations, religion, regional and international relations, the environment, economic arrangements, and social changes, for example, the 1950 marriage law and revisions to the 1980 marriage law. The inclusion of well-chosen documents complements the chapter contents, reducing the challenge in locating relevant primary sources. e g Th rowing interest in China is drawing more and more people to learning its language, culture, and history. A suggestion for the publisher or series editors to consider for future editions is to include Chinese characters for proper names in the glossary and “Who’s Who” to provide a visual aid to students who have basic Chinese-language skills. Xiaoping Sun Xiaoping Sun is an assistant professor of history at Saint Mary’s University, Canada, with research interests focusing on Manchuria, Northeast China, and gender in modern China. Timothy Brook. e T Th roubled Empire: China in the Yuan and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Troubled Empire: China in the Yuan and Ming Dynasties by Timothy Brook (review)

China Review International , Volume 19 (2) – May 7, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/the-troubled-empire-china-in-the-yuan-and-ming-dynasties-by-timothy-fpR0T6EA0l
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews 215 effective use of the material. Brief explanations of items from “Who’s Who” and the glossary also appear in the margins of relevant text in the second edition, a handy resource for beginning learners. The thirty-two primary documents at the end of the book cover a wide range of topics including political campaigns, democratic movements, ethnic relations, religion, regional and international relations, the environment, economic arrangements, and social changes, for example, the 1950 marriage law and revisions to the 1980 marriage law. The inclusion of well-chosen documents complements the chapter contents, reducing the challenge in locating relevant primary sources. e g Th rowing interest in China is drawing more and more people to learning its language, culture, and history. A suggestion for the publisher or series editors to consider for future editions is to include Chinese characters for proper names in the glossary and “Who’s Who” to provide a visual aid to students who have basic Chinese-language skills. Xiaoping Sun Xiaoping Sun is an assistant professor of history at Saint Mary’s University, Canada, with research interests focusing on Manchuria, Northeast China, and gender in modern China. Timothy Brook. e T Th roubled Empire: China in the Yuan and

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 7, 2014

There are no references for this article.