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The Travels by Marco Polo (review)

The Travels by Marco Polo (review) Reviews 23 In sum, City versus Countryside in Mao’s China: Negotiating the Divide is a compelling, skillfully crae ft d study that presents a challenge to scholars who might hold a more positive view of the Mao era. Perhaps Brown could have engaged directly with those scholars or done more to draw out the theoretical implications of the study, for example, by assessing the relative weight of institutions and ideology in maintaining and sharpening the divide. Still, the book is successful in its main purpose, which is to leave readers with little doubt that Mao-era politics, in spite of lofty rhetoric to the contrary, was deeply rooted in urban bias. Overall, the book has much to oer s ff tudents of modern Chinese history, especially those interested in the post–Great Leap Forward period, and has big implications for understanding the origins of anti-rural discrimination in China today. Kristen E. Looney Kristen E. Looney is an assistant professor of Asian studies and government at Georgetown University. She is completing a book on rural modernization campaigns in China, Taiwan, and South Korea. Marco Polo. The Travels. Translated with an introduction and notes by Nigel Cliff. Penguin Classics. London: Penguin, 2015. li, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Travels by Marco Polo (review)

China Review International , Volume 21 (1) – Aug 3, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews 23 In sum, City versus Countryside in Mao’s China: Negotiating the Divide is a compelling, skillfully crae ft d study that presents a challenge to scholars who might hold a more positive view of the Mao era. Perhaps Brown could have engaged directly with those scholars or done more to draw out the theoretical implications of the study, for example, by assessing the relative weight of institutions and ideology in maintaining and sharpening the divide. Still, the book is successful in its main purpose, which is to leave readers with little doubt that Mao-era politics, in spite of lofty rhetoric to the contrary, was deeply rooted in urban bias. Overall, the book has much to oer s ff tudents of modern Chinese history, especially those interested in the post–Great Leap Forward period, and has big implications for understanding the origins of anti-rural discrimination in China today. Kristen E. Looney Kristen E. Looney is an assistant professor of Asian studies and government at Georgetown University. She is completing a book on rural modernization campaigns in China, Taiwan, and South Korea. Marco Polo. The Travels. Translated with an introduction and notes by Nigel Cliff. Penguin Classics. London: Penguin, 2015. li,

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 3, 2016

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