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The Traditional Chinese Iron Industry and Its Modern Fate (review)

The Traditional Chinese Iron Industry and Its Modern Fate (review) 540 China Review International: Vol. 6, No. 2, Fall 1999 Donald B. Wagner. The Traditional Chinese Iron Industry and Its Modern Fate. With a foreword by Peter Nolan. Nordic Institute of Asian Studies monograph series, no. 32. Richmond, Surrey, England: Curzon Press, 1997. xii, 106 pp. Hardcover, ISBN 0­7007­0951­7. Donald Wagner's slim volume on iron production in China takes us on an enjoyable journey back to the origins of one of China's key heavy industries. For students of the contemporary Chinese economy, this book fills in gaps and has implications that range beyond the sector that is highlighted here. Wagner's main argument, presented in four case studies, is that different conditions in various regions of China shaped the way the iron industry has developed over the past few centuries. In the Dabieshan region on the AnhuiHenan-Hubei border, difficulties in transportation meant that small blast furnaces could best provide for the needs of nearby consumers. In isolated Sichuan, good regional transportation meant that large furnaces could produce amounts commensurate with economies of scale. Shanxi found a good market in north China, but the technique of crucible smelting complicated reaching an economy of a similar scale. But Guangdong's rivers and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Traditional Chinese Iron Industry and Its Modern Fate (review)

China Review International , Volume 6 (2) – Sep 1, 1999

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright by University of Hawaii Press
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1527-9367
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Abstract

540 China Review International: Vol. 6, No. 2, Fall 1999 Donald B. Wagner. The Traditional Chinese Iron Industry and Its Modern Fate. With a foreword by Peter Nolan. Nordic Institute of Asian Studies monograph series, no. 32. Richmond, Surrey, England: Curzon Press, 1997. xii, 106 pp. Hardcover, ISBN 0­7007­0951­7. Donald Wagner's slim volume on iron production in China takes us on an enjoyable journey back to the origins of one of China's key heavy industries. For students of the contemporary Chinese economy, this book fills in gaps and has implications that range beyond the sector that is highlighted here. Wagner's main argument, presented in four case studies, is that different conditions in various regions of China shaped the way the iron industry has developed over the past few centuries. In the Dabieshan region on the AnhuiHenan-Hubei border, difficulties in transportation meant that small blast furnaces could best provide for the needs of nearby consumers. In isolated Sichuan, good regional transportation meant that large furnaces could produce amounts commensurate with economies of scale. Shanxi found a good market in north China, but the technique of crucible smelting complicated reaching an economy of a similar scale. But Guangdong's rivers and

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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