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The Thought and Legacy of Masao Abe

The Thought and Legacy of Masao Abe PANEL ON MASAO ABE Christopher Ives Masao Abe stands as the most important Buddhist in modern interfaith dialogue and the main transmitter of Zen thought to the West following the death of D. T. Suzuki. His most widely read work, Zen and Western Thought, edited by William LaFleur, won an award in 1987 from the American Academy of Religion as the best recent publication in the "constructive and reflective" category. Abe followed that influential volume with further collections of essays edited by Steven Heine: Buddhism and Interfaith Dialogue, Zen and Comparative Studies, and Zen and the Modern World. Abe also wrote widely in Japanese, with his most mature thought finding expression in several volumes he published later in life: Kongen no shuppatsu (Starting from the Root), Kyogi to kyomu (Falsehood and Nihility), and Hibutsu hima (Neither Buddha nor Devil). Abe also made significant contributions to the study of the renowned Sötö Zen thinker Dögen (1200­1253). With Norman Waddell he translated a number of fascicles of Dögen's Shöbö-genzö, which appeared in The Eastern Buddhist and were then compiled as The Heart of Dögen's Shöbö-genzö. Abe published his own essays on Dögen, again with Heine's editorial help, in the volume http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

The Thought and Legacy of Masao Abe

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 28 (1) – Nov 14, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

PANEL ON MASAO ABE Christopher Ives Masao Abe stands as the most important Buddhist in modern interfaith dialogue and the main transmitter of Zen thought to the West following the death of D. T. Suzuki. His most widely read work, Zen and Western Thought, edited by William LaFleur, won an award in 1987 from the American Academy of Religion as the best recent publication in the "constructive and reflective" category. Abe followed that influential volume with further collections of essays edited by Steven Heine: Buddhism and Interfaith Dialogue, Zen and Comparative Studies, and Zen and the Modern World. Abe also wrote widely in Japanese, with his most mature thought finding expression in several volumes he published later in life: Kongen no shuppatsu (Starting from the Root), Kyogi to kyomu (Falsehood and Nihility), and Hibutsu hima (Neither Buddha nor Devil). Abe also made significant contributions to the study of the renowned Sötö Zen thinker Dögen (1200­1253). With Norman Waddell he translated a number of fascicles of Dögen's Shöbö-genzö, which appeared in The Eastern Buddhist and were then compiled as The Heart of Dögen's Shöbö-genzö. Abe published his own essays on Dögen, again with Heine's editorial help, in the volume

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 14, 2008

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