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The Temple of Memories: History, Power, and Morality in a Chinese Village (review)

The Temple of Memories: History, Power, and Morality in a Chinese Village (review) i6o China Review International: Vol. 5, No. 1, Spring 1998 6.For example, John M. Rosenfield, The Dynastic Arts of the Kushans (reprint, New Dehli: Munshiram Manoharlal, 1993), pis. 104-106. 7.For example, Banyue #^£3 (Dangyang Municipality "S-(^TfJ, Hubei), Mi (Yichang Diqu Bowuguan JËfitÈlM%fl, Dangyang-shi Bowuguan #Hiïfï[f$5il, "Hubei Dangyang Banyue Dong-Han mu fajue jianbao" Mlt^W^^nWMM^kMWi^, Wenwu 1991, no. 12:68, figs. 6-7). Jun Jing. The Temple ofMemories: History, Power, and Morality in a Chinese Village. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996. x, 217 pp. Hardcover $29.95, isbn 0-8047-2756-2. During the Ming dynasty, four brothers surnamed Kong, who believed they could trace their ancestry directly to Confucius (Kong Zi), settled in Dachuan village in the Yellow River valley in Gansu Province. Their descendants, who today comprise 85 percent of the village's population of 3,300 (the others mostly arrived this past century), took great pride in their illustrious progenitor, and they developed elaborate lineage ceremonies that served as an organizational focus for their community. The revival of these ceremonies in the 1980s and the construction of an elegant new ancestor temple centering on Confucius form the subject matter of this conceptually sophisticated, beautifully written, and at times moving book. Jun Jing had first visited http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Temple of Memories: History, Power, and Morality in a Chinese Village (review)

China Review International , Volume 5 (1) – Mar 30, 1998

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Abstract

i6o China Review International: Vol. 5, No. 1, Spring 1998 6.For example, John M. Rosenfield, The Dynastic Arts of the Kushans (reprint, New Dehli: Munshiram Manoharlal, 1993), pis. 104-106. 7.For example, Banyue #^£3 (Dangyang Municipality "S-(^TfJ, Hubei), Mi (Yichang Diqu Bowuguan JËfitÈlM%fl, Dangyang-shi Bowuguan #Hiïfï[f$5il, "Hubei Dangyang Banyue Dong-Han mu fajue jianbao" Mlt^W^^nWMM^kMWi^, Wenwu 1991, no. 12:68, figs. 6-7). Jun Jing. The Temple ofMemories: History, Power, and Morality in a Chinese Village. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996. x, 217 pp. Hardcover $29.95, isbn 0-8047-2756-2. During the Ming dynasty, four brothers surnamed Kong, who believed they could trace their ancestry directly to Confucius (Kong Zi), settled in Dachuan village in the Yellow River valley in Gansu Province. Their descendants, who today comprise 85 percent of the village's population of 3,300 (the others mostly arrived this past century), took great pride in their illustrious progenitor, and they developed elaborate lineage ceremonies that served as an organizational focus for their community. The revival of these ceremonies in the 1980s and the construction of an elegant new ancestor temple centering on Confucius form the subject matter of this conceptually sophisticated, beautifully written, and at times moving book. Jun Jing had first visited

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1998

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