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The Spirit of Zhyge Alu: The Nuosu Poetry of Aku Wuwu

The Spirit of Zhyge Alu: The Nuosu Poetry of Aku Wuwu M A R K B E N D E R The turbulent waters of the roaring Yalong River swept beneath the lowslung bridge suspended between the narrow pink and gray cliffs. Aku Wuwu pointed across the boards--held together with cable and wire--and toward a narrow valley that led into the sparsely vegetated mountains. "Up in there lies my village--another hour's walk up that trail. This is where I crossed to get to school. These grasses along the river--they are the same ones the original Yi clans clung to when migrating up these river valleys into Liangshan. The ancient myths tell of these grasses." Aku Wuwu (Nuosu romanization: Apkup Vytvy) is a well-known poet of the Nuosu branch of the Yi of southwest China. Once known as the Lolo, the Yi are one of the largest ethnic-minority groups in China, numbering around seven million; dozens of branches live in mountainous areas in the provinces of Yunnan, Sichuan, Guizhou, and the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Over two million Nuosu live in the Liangshan Yi Nationality Autonomous Prefecture in the Liangshan Mountains of southern Sichuan and in the smaller Ninglang Prefecture in northern Yunnan. Until the mid-1950s, the Nuosu in Liangshan http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

The Spirit of Zhyge Alu: The Nuosu Poetry of Aku Wuwu

Manoa , Volume 17 (1) – Jul 7, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-943x
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Abstract

M A R K B E N D E R The turbulent waters of the roaring Yalong River swept beneath the lowslung bridge suspended between the narrow pink and gray cliffs. Aku Wuwu pointed across the boards--held together with cable and wire--and toward a narrow valley that led into the sparsely vegetated mountains. "Up in there lies my village--another hour's walk up that trail. This is where I crossed to get to school. These grasses along the river--they are the same ones the original Yi clans clung to when migrating up these river valleys into Liangshan. The ancient myths tell of these grasses." Aku Wuwu (Nuosu romanization: Apkup Vytvy) is a well-known poet of the Nuosu branch of the Yi of southwest China. Once known as the Lolo, the Yi are one of the largest ethnic-minority groups in China, numbering around seven million; dozens of branches live in mountainous areas in the provinces of Yunnan, Sichuan, Guizhou, and the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Over two million Nuosu live in the Liangshan Yi Nationality Autonomous Prefecture in the Liangshan Mountains of southern Sichuan and in the smaller Ninglang Prefecture in northern Yunnan. Until the mid-1950s, the Nuosu in Liangshan

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 7, 2005

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