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The Songmaker's Chair (review)

The Songmaker's Chair (review) the contemporary pacific · 17:1 (2005) In the final scene, the narrator reiterates the film's title: "The old women say, `Kuo hina `e hiapo'" (The mulberry is ripe and ready for harvest). She emphasizes a generational rift by stating that younger people are rarely heard using this saying. The message of generational tensions resonates, echoing the sentiments of an older kautaha woman who confidently states that ngatumaking "will never end in this land" and a younger woman who says, "It seems like the younger generation will forget." Thus the filmmakers provide a well-balanced presentation of these differing opinions, even as the film ends on a positive note: "Like the beating of a heart as long as the beating of tutu can be heard . . . the culture and traditions of Tonga will live on." I commend the filmmakers for not attempting to make any firm predictions about the future of ngatu and ngatu-making and for letting the women, and their cloth, speak for themselves. practices--however ancient or newfangled--is glossed over in this focus on cloth production activities, which today are the domain of commoner women. While the film does mention the increasing global relevance of Tongan barkcloth, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Songmaker's Chair (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 17 (1) – Jan 27, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 17:1 (2005) In the final scene, the narrator reiterates the film's title: "The old women say, `Kuo hina `e hiapo'" (The mulberry is ripe and ready for harvest). She emphasizes a generational rift by stating that younger people are rarely heard using this saying. The message of generational tensions resonates, echoing the sentiments of an older kautaha woman who confidently states that ngatumaking "will never end in this land" and a younger woman who says, "It seems like the younger generation will forget." Thus the filmmakers provide a well-balanced presentation of these differing opinions, even as the film ends on a positive note: "Like the beating of a heart as long as the beating of tutu can be heard . . . the culture and traditions of Tonga will live on." I commend the filmmakers for not attempting to make any firm predictions about the future of ngatu and ngatu-making and for letting the women, and their cloth, speak for themselves. practices--however ancient or newfangled--is glossed over in this focus on cloth production activities, which today are the domain of commoner women. While the film does mention the increasing global relevance of Tongan barkcloth,

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 27, 2005

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