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The Silent Dialogue: Zen Letters to a Trappist Monk, and: Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit: The Place of Zen in Christian Life (review)

The Silent Dialogue: Zen Letters to a Trappist Monk, and: Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit: The Place... BOOK REVIEWS THE SILENT DIALOGUE: ZEN LETTERS TO A TRAPPIST MONK. By David G. Hackett. New York: Continuum, 1996. 157 pp. ZEN SPIRIT, CHRISTIAN SPIRIT: THE PLACE OF ZEN IN CHRIS- TIAN LIFE. By Robert E. Kennedy. New York: Continuum, 1997. 144 pp. Two very different books recently published by Continuum seem to complement each other in unexpected ways. Father Kennedy, Catholic Zen Teacher, Jesuit Priest, openly shares with us his own journey into unknowing and self-emptying. As he notes in his preface, “what I looked for in Zen was not a new faith, but a new way of being Catholic that grew out of my own lived experience . . .” (p. 13). David Hackett, now an associate professor of religion, freely shares his youthful search for genuine spiritual experience. His book is drawn from correspondence from the 1970s with Father Thomas Keating and the monks of the St. Joseph’s Abbey during his two-year stay in Japan. Hackett says in his Prologue, “I became a Catholic through Zen med- itation . . .” (p. 17). In both cases, rather than threaten or diminish their Christian faith, Zen practice served as a wonderful “can-opener,” prying off lids of rigid http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

The Silent Dialogue: Zen Letters to a Trappist Monk, and: Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit: The Place of Zen in Christian Life (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 20 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS THE SILENT DIALOGUE: ZEN LETTERS TO A TRAPPIST MONK. By David G. Hackett. New York: Continuum, 1996. 157 pp. ZEN SPIRIT, CHRISTIAN SPIRIT: THE PLACE OF ZEN IN CHRIS- TIAN LIFE. By Robert E. Kennedy. New York: Continuum, 1997. 144 pp. Two very different books recently published by Continuum seem to complement each other in unexpected ways. Father Kennedy, Catholic Zen Teacher, Jesuit Priest, openly shares with us his own journey into unknowing and self-emptying. As he notes in his preface, “what I looked for in Zen was not a new faith, but a new way of being Catholic that grew out of my own lived experience . . .” (p. 13). David Hackett, now an associate professor of religion, freely shares his youthful search for genuine spiritual experience. His book is drawn from correspondence from the 1970s with Father Thomas Keating and the monks of the St. Joseph’s Abbey during his two-year stay in Japan. Hackett says in his Prologue, “I became a Catholic through Zen med- itation . . .” (p. 17). In both cases, rather than threaten or diminish their Christian faith, Zen practice served as a wonderful “can-opener,” prying off lids of rigid

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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