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The Rule of Empires: Those Who Built Them, Those Who Endured Them, and Why They Always Fall (review)

The Rule of Empires: Those Who Built Them, Those Who Endured Them, and Why They Always Fall (review) journal of world history, june 2012 formative in their view of the past. As is usual, journalists have supplanted historians in writing these stories, most recently with Christian Parenti's The Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (2011). The World and Environmental History expertly succeeds in challenging this monopoly. niklas robinson Delaware State University The Rule of Empires: Those Who Built Them, Those Who Endured Them, and Why They Always Fall. By timothy h. parsons. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. 480 pp. $29.95 (cloth). The last few years have seen a flurry of books by scholars specializing, or dabbling, in comparative colonialism and imperialism. Timothy Parsons, a historian of colonial Africa, has thrown his hat into the ring with a straightforward and unnuanced thesis: empires are "unsustainable because their subjects find them intolerable," for imperial rule has "always meant denigration and exploitation." Parsons offers seven case studies of such empires "unbearable and eventually untenable": Roman Britain, Umayyad Spain, Spanish Peru, British India and Kenya, Napoleonic Italy, and, curiously, Nazi-occupied France (p. 4). Committed to presenting the experience of empire "from the bottom up," Parsons criticizes scholars and "imperial enthusiasts" who study empires from the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Rule of Empires: Those Who Built Them, Those Who Endured Them, and Why They Always Fall (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (2) – Aug 9, 2012

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University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, june 2012 formative in their view of the past. As is usual, journalists have supplanted historians in writing these stories, most recently with Christian Parenti's The Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (2011). The World and Environmental History expertly succeeds in challenging this monopoly. niklas robinson Delaware State University The Rule of Empires: Those Who Built Them, Those Who Endured Them, and Why They Always Fall. By timothy h. parsons. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. 480 pp. $29.95 (cloth). The last few years have seen a flurry of books by scholars specializing, or dabbling, in comparative colonialism and imperialism. Timothy Parsons, a historian of colonial Africa, has thrown his hat into the ring with a straightforward and unnuanced thesis: empires are "unsustainable because their subjects find them intolerable," for imperial rule has "always meant denigration and exploitation." Parsons offers seven case studies of such empires "unbearable and eventually untenable": Roman Britain, Umayyad Spain, Spanish Peru, British India and Kenya, Napoleonic Italy, and, curiously, Nazi-occupied France (p. 4). Committed to presenting the experience of empire "from the bottom up," Parsons criticizes scholars and "imperial enthusiasts" who study empires from the

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 9, 2012

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