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The Role of Time in the Structure of Chinese Logic

The Role of Time in the Structure of Chinese Logic Philosophy Department, Creighton University Introduction Chinese logicians in ancient times presupposed no fixed order in the . Things are changing all the time. If this is true, then universal rules that aim to represent fixed order in the for all time are not possible. Chinese logical reasoning instead foregrounds the element of time as now. Time, then, plays a crucial role in the structure of Chinese logic. To disclose the special structure of Chinese logic, I shall discuss the Later Mohist Canon and the works of some other philosophers in ancient China. The Later Mohist writings can be taken as a summary of logical rules and principles that guided the Chinese in the development of their arguments. Some comparative philosophers have studied this great classical text from different perspectives. For example, Chinese scholars such as Fung Yu-lan, Tan Jiepu, and Xu Xiyan try to use Aristotelian formal logic to explain many of the rules and principles in the Later Mohist Canon.1 In the West, comparative philosophers such as A. C. Graham and Chad Hansen have also made careful examinations of this great classical text. Graham produced a fine translation, with detailed commentary, of the Later Mohist Canon, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Role of Time in the Structure of Chinese Logic

Philosophy East and West , Volume 56 (1) – Mar 1, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
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Abstract

Philosophy Department, Creighton University Introduction Chinese logicians in ancient times presupposed no fixed order in the . Things are changing all the time. If this is true, then universal rules that aim to represent fixed order in the for all time are not possible. Chinese logical reasoning instead foregrounds the element of time as now. Time, then, plays a crucial role in the structure of Chinese logic. To disclose the special structure of Chinese logic, I shall discuss the Later Mohist Canon and the works of some other philosophers in ancient China. The Later Mohist writings can be taken as a summary of logical rules and principles that guided the Chinese in the development of their arguments. Some comparative philosophers have studied this great classical text from different perspectives. For example, Chinese scholars such as Fung Yu-lan, Tan Jiepu, and Xu Xiyan try to use Aristotelian formal logic to explain many of the rules and principles in the Later Mohist Canon.1 In the West, comparative philosophers such as A. C. Graham and Chad Hansen have also made careful examinations of this great classical text. Graham produced a fine translation, with detailed commentary, of the Later Mohist Canon, and

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2006

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