Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Prehistoric Archaeology of Norfolk Island, Southwest Pacific (review)

The Prehistoric Archaeology of Norfolk Island, Southwest Pacific (review) ments, artists. Sorovi-Vunidilo charts a path toward better archaeological research by incorporating islander perspectives in all phases of work and by encouraging archaeologists' conscious attention to the responsibilities they have to the living descendents of the archaeological record. Cauchois details the organizational changes in the administration of archaeological projects in French Polynesia and discusses the primary goal of identifying all of the archaeological resources in French Polynesia to both facilitate comparative research and plan for the preservation of cultural resources. Prickett provides an overview of 150 years of New Zealand archaeology, highlighting past antiquarianism, modern archaeology and the Maori, and ``alternative archaeologies'' ( p. 381) or pseudoarchaeology (see Feder 1999). The last chapter of the volume, by Urlich, discusses Lapita pottery from the perspective of a Maori potter and examines the possibilities of clay-working technology in ancient Maori contexts. Pacific Archaeology is a beautifully produced volume with well-written and wellillustrated chapters. Sand has produced no mere set of conference papers, but an important work displaying the current state of Oceanic archaeology, which leads me to a final analytical comment. Many of the synthetic chapters (and some of the substantive) in Pacific Archaeology tacitly ask, how do we explain http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

The Prehistoric Archaeology of Norfolk Island, Southwest Pacific (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 44 (2) – Nov 21, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/the-prehistoric-archaeology-of-norfolk-island-southwest-pacific-review-qAgbmPECkA
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ments, artists. Sorovi-Vunidilo charts a path toward better archaeological research by incorporating islander perspectives in all phases of work and by encouraging archaeologists' conscious attention to the responsibilities they have to the living descendents of the archaeological record. Cauchois details the organizational changes in the administration of archaeological projects in French Polynesia and discusses the primary goal of identifying all of the archaeological resources in French Polynesia to both facilitate comparative research and plan for the preservation of cultural resources. Prickett provides an overview of 150 years of New Zealand archaeology, highlighting past antiquarianism, modern archaeology and the Maori, and ``alternative archaeologies'' ( p. 381) or pseudoarchaeology (see Feder 1999). The last chapter of the volume, by Urlich, discusses Lapita pottery from the perspective of a Maori potter and examines the possibilities of clay-working technology in ancient Maori contexts. Pacific Archaeology is a beautifully produced volume with well-written and wellillustrated chapters. Sand has produced no mere set of conference papers, but an important work displaying the current state of Oceanic archaeology, which leads me to a final analytical comment. Many of the synthetic chapters (and some of the substantive) in Pacific Archaeology tacitly ask, how do we explain

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 21, 2005

There are no references for this article.