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The Power of Print in Modern China: Intellectuals and Industrial Publishing from the End of Empire to Maoist State Socialism by Robert Culp (review)

The Power of Print in Modern China: Intellectuals and Industrial Publishing from the End of... Reviews  Audience With its accessible writing, and cogent and concise explanations, the book is perfect for scholars, students, and lay readers. It would be excellent as a text for courses on twentieth to twenty-first century art (esp. painting) from China, but even seasoned Chinese painting experts will gain from reading this text. Notes and Bibliography The Notes provide not only basic reference information but also and often, useful and interesting commentary (e.g., p. ,n–). As for the Bibliography, I regret to have to write that there is none. No doubt this was an editorial decision, but it was the wrong one. As good as the notes are (and they are excellent), they are not easy to search for sources. Consequently, this invaluable book is less useful as a research tool than it should be. This is a flaw, but not a fatal flaw: Clarke’s China—Art—Modernity offers a masterful explanation of art from an extended China from the nineteenth century to the present. Katharine P. Burnett Katharine P. Burnett is an associate professor of art history at the University of California, Davis, specializing in studies of Chinese art and theory from the Ming to the contemporary. Her publications include http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Power of Print in Modern China: Intellectuals and Industrial Publishing from the End of Empire to Maoist State Socialism by Robert Culp (review)

China Review International , Volume 25 (2) – Jul 23, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews  Audience With its accessible writing, and cogent and concise explanations, the book is perfect for scholars, students, and lay readers. It would be excellent as a text for courses on twentieth to twenty-first century art (esp. painting) from China, but even seasoned Chinese painting experts will gain from reading this text. Notes and Bibliography The Notes provide not only basic reference information but also and often, useful and interesting commentary (e.g., p. ,n–). As for the Bibliography, I regret to have to write that there is none. No doubt this was an editorial decision, but it was the wrong one. As good as the notes are (and they are excellent), they are not easy to search for sources. Consequently, this invaluable book is less useful as a research tool than it should be. This is a flaw, but not a fatal flaw: Clarke’s China—Art—Modernity offers a masterful explanation of art from an extended China from the nineteenth century to the present. Katharine P. Burnett Katharine P. Burnett is an associate professor of art history at the University of California, Davis, specializing in studies of Chinese art and theory from the Ming to the contemporary. Her publications include

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 23, 2020

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