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The Philosophical Thought of Tasan Chŏng (review)

The Philosophical Thought of Tasan Chŏng (review) Book Reviews 191 The most frequent role is really that of donor and patron, so that it is not surprising that Cho and Park both isolated women’s economic means and self-sufficiency as the single most important reason for the enduring presence and eventual flourishing of female monasticism in Korean Buddhist history. Collected together, this set of solidly researched essays provides a sound introduction to the study of women in Korean Buddhism. They exemplify ways in which modern scholarship could overcome the problematic dearth of primary records that has stunted the study of Korean Buddhist women for a long time. In this regard, the essays by Puggioni, Jorgenson, and Jung are particularly important as they model how non-traditional accounts of religion, like epigraphy, legal records, non-Buddhist chronicles, and popular literature can yield important glimpses and insights into women practitioners whose lives and contributions are often omitted from traditional accounts of Buddhist history. Admittedly, the volume gives uneven attention to its subjects, and the majority of the essays are about nuns rather than laywomen. Moreover, it would have been ideal to have a final chapter on contemporary Buddhist women to wrap up the volume chronologically. But these are minor quibbles intended http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Korean Religions University of Hawai'I Press

The Philosophical Thought of Tasan Chŏng (review)

Journal of Korean Religions , Volume 3 (2) – Nov 23, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, Korea
ISSN
2093-7288
eISSN
2167-2040

Abstract

Book Reviews 191 The most frequent role is really that of donor and patron, so that it is not surprising that Cho and Park both isolated women’s economic means and self-sufficiency as the single most important reason for the enduring presence and eventual flourishing of female monasticism in Korean Buddhist history. Collected together, this set of solidly researched essays provides a sound introduction to the study of women in Korean Buddhism. They exemplify ways in which modern scholarship could overcome the problematic dearth of primary records that has stunted the study of Korean Buddhist women for a long time. In this regard, the essays by Puggioni, Jorgenson, and Jung are particularly important as they model how non-traditional accounts of religion, like epigraphy, legal records, non-Buddhist chronicles, and popular literature can yield important glimpses and insights into women practitioners whose lives and contributions are often omitted from traditional accounts of Buddhist history. Admittedly, the volume gives uneven attention to its subjects, and the majority of the essays are about nuns rather than laywomen. Moreover, it would have been ideal to have a final chapter on contemporary Buddhist women to wrap up the volume chronologically. But these are minor quibbles intended

Journal

Journal of Korean ReligionsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 23, 2012

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