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The Phantom Heroine: Ghost and Gender in Seventeenth-Century Chinese Literature (review)

The Phantom Heroine: Ghost and Gender in Seventeenth-Century Chinese Literature (review) Reviews Herman F. Huang is with the North Carolina Department of Transportation and holds degrees in environmental science and urban planning. He is a community planner specializing in the impacts of transportation projects on the human environment. Notes 1. The World Bank, China Quarterly Update, March 2010. http://siteresources.worldbank. org/CHINAEXTN/Resources/318949-1268688634523/CQU_march2010.pdf (Accessed on April 4, 2010). 2. The World Bank and State Environmental Protection Administration (People's Republic of China), Cost of Pollution in China: Economic Estimates of Physical Damage (Washington, DC: The World Bank, 2007). http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTEAPREGTOPENVIRONMENT/ Resources/China_Cost_of_Pollution.pdf (Accessed on January 10, 2010). Judith T. Zeitlin. The Phantom Heroine: Ghost and Gender in SeventeenthCentury Chinese Literature. Honolulu: University of Hawai`i Press, 2007. 296 pp. Hardcover $57.00, isbn 978-0-8248-3091-5. Chinese ghost stories from Liaozhai zhiyi, the famous collection of classical tales by Pu Songling (1640­1715), often strike today's Western readers as singularly devoid of the element of horror. "They are not scary!" My students would typically say. In lieu of unsightly alien beings innately malicious to the living, the ghosts in Liaozhai are impressively humanlike.1 Significantly, this benign imagination of ghosthood is coupled with a distinctive gendering strategy: In Pu's stories, the returning dead is usually a female, and the principal human http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Phantom Heroine: Ghost and Gender in Seventeenth-Century Chinese Literature (review)

China Review International , Volume 16 (3) – Jan 6, 2009

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews Herman F. Huang is with the North Carolina Department of Transportation and holds degrees in environmental science and urban planning. He is a community planner specializing in the impacts of transportation projects on the human environment. Notes 1. The World Bank, China Quarterly Update, March 2010. http://siteresources.worldbank. org/CHINAEXTN/Resources/318949-1268688634523/CQU_march2010.pdf (Accessed on April 4, 2010). 2. The World Bank and State Environmental Protection Administration (People's Republic of China), Cost of Pollution in China: Economic Estimates of Physical Damage (Washington, DC: The World Bank, 2007). http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTEAPREGTOPENVIRONMENT/ Resources/China_Cost_of_Pollution.pdf (Accessed on January 10, 2010). Judith T. Zeitlin. The Phantom Heroine: Ghost and Gender in SeventeenthCentury Chinese Literature. Honolulu: University of Hawai`i Press, 2007. 296 pp. Hardcover $57.00, isbn 978-0-8248-3091-5. Chinese ghost stories from Liaozhai zhiyi, the famous collection of classical tales by Pu Songling (1640­1715), often strike today's Western readers as singularly devoid of the element of horror. "They are not scary!" My students would typically say. In lieu of unsightly alien beings innately malicious to the living, the ghosts in Liaozhai are impressively humanlike.1 Significantly, this benign imagination of ghosthood is coupled with a distinctive gendering strategy: In Pu's stories, the returning dead is usually a female, and the principal human

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 6, 2009

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