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The Pattera of Guam: Their Story and Legacy (review)

The Pattera of Guam: Their Story and Legacy (review) the contemporary pacific · fall 2002 to introduce to students are embedded, but not too covertly, in this new, readable ethnography, which offers an optimistic entry for this Tuvalu community to the new millennium. "smallness" as a euphemism for economic nonviability. Those that colonial structures divided for their own spoils now assert their distinctive identities within wider political amalgamations such as the Association of Small Island States and the Pacific Islands Forum. The influence of the British, Americans, and Australians in engendering different solutions to today's challenges is a mind-game that is likely to distinguish a Nanumean's thinking from any outsider's viewpoint. They are likely to differ among themselves about what things from the outside world should be considered necessities, and what from the island must be preserved for the future. But exploring those possibilities will help place their communities within their idiosyncratic framework rather than using an outsider template such as a particular political or ecological rubric. This text will be welcomed by those complementing their teaching with clear, readable ethnographic accounts that allow the peoples' voices to be heard. At the same time this ethnography provides an introduction to many aspects of social structure, work, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Pattera of Guam: Their Story and Legacy (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 14 (2) – Jan 7, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2002 to introduce to students are embedded, but not too covertly, in this new, readable ethnography, which offers an optimistic entry for this Tuvalu community to the new millennium. "smallness" as a euphemism for economic nonviability. Those that colonial structures divided for their own spoils now assert their distinctive identities within wider political amalgamations such as the Association of Small Island States and the Pacific Islands Forum. The influence of the British, Americans, and Australians in engendering different solutions to today's challenges is a mind-game that is likely to distinguish a Nanumean's thinking from any outsider's viewpoint. They are likely to differ among themselves about what things from the outside world should be considered necessities, and what from the island must be preserved for the future. But exploring those possibilities will help place their communities within their idiosyncratic framework rather than using an outsider template such as a particular political or ecological rubric. This text will be welcomed by those complementing their teaching with clear, readable ethnographic accounts that allow the peoples' voices to be heard. At the same time this ethnography provides an introduction to many aspects of social structure, work, and

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 7, 2002

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