Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

The Paradox of Power in a People's Republic of China Middle School (review)

The Paradox of Power in a People's Republic of China Middle School (review) Reviews 229 Martin Schoenhals. The Paradox ofPower in a People's Republic ofChina Middle School. Armonk and London: M. E. Sharpe, 1993. vii, 215 pp. Hardcover $59.95. Paperback $22.50. Martin Schoenhals spent thirteen months teaching and observing at a key Chinese middle school in 1988 and 1989. The Paradox ofPower is a result of this experience. With the often perceptive eye of a trained ethnographer, Schoenhals argues tiiat salient cultural norms including die desire to save face, a propensity to engage in critical evaluation, the desire to achieve and attain popular acclaim, and a willingness to pursue competitive activity incessantly as a means of gaining achievement together create an interesting contradiction within Chinese middle school life tìiat is reflective of broader social tendencies. Specifically, the more one acquires authority, the greater the likelihood diat one will be subjected to criticism. But because responding to such criticism directiy would mean compromising the superiority of one's position, by implicitly acknowledging the equal and reciprocal status of the critic, open criticism on the part of underlings, be they students in school settings or children in family situations, is actually tolerated by teachers and parents, and is even encouraged under certain circumstances. To http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Paradox of Power in a People's Republic of China Middle School (review)

China Review International , Volume 2 (1) – Mar 30, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/the-paradox-of-power-in-a-people-s-republic-of-china-middle-school-PFf5hG96N8
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews 229 Martin Schoenhals. The Paradox ofPower in a People's Republic ofChina Middle School. Armonk and London: M. E. Sharpe, 1993. vii, 215 pp. Hardcover $59.95. Paperback $22.50. Martin Schoenhals spent thirteen months teaching and observing at a key Chinese middle school in 1988 and 1989. The Paradox ofPower is a result of this experience. With the often perceptive eye of a trained ethnographer, Schoenhals argues tiiat salient cultural norms including die desire to save face, a propensity to engage in critical evaluation, the desire to achieve and attain popular acclaim, and a willingness to pursue competitive activity incessantly as a means of gaining achievement together create an interesting contradiction within Chinese middle school life tìiat is reflective of broader social tendencies. Specifically, the more one acquires authority, the greater the likelihood diat one will be subjected to criticism. But because responding to such criticism directiy would mean compromising the superiority of one's position, by implicitly acknowledging the equal and reciprocal status of the critic, open criticism on the part of underlings, be they students in school settings or children in family situations, is actually tolerated by teachers and parents, and is even encouraged under certain circumstances. To

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1995

There are no references for this article.