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The Mozi as an Evolving Text: Different Voices in Early Chinese Thought ed. by Carine Defoort and Nicolas Standaert (review)

The Mozi as an Evolving Text: Different Voices in Early Chinese Thought ed. by Carine Defoort and... Reviews 87 Carine Defoort and Nicolas Standaert, editors. The Mozi as an Evolving Text: Different Voices in Early Chinese Thought. Studies in the History of Chinese Texts, volume 4. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2013, 294 pp. Hardcover $166.00, isbn 978-90-04-23434-5. Mo Di (ca. 479­381 b.c.e.) has been a rather neglected figure in Chinese intellectual history over the more than two millennia since he and his followers offered the first significant philosophical challenge to developing Confucianism in their attempts to devise a workable social and political philosophy that would cure the ills of the Warring States period (475­221 b.c.e.). The neglect is reflected in the treatment of the eponymous work (the Mozi), which has, nevertheless, survived, albeit with significant textual difficulties in two of its five sections. The other three sections seem to have survived relatively well, although there are apparent losses of chapters and the inevitable uncertainties about the time and manner of composition and the actual author or authors/editors. Moreover, although the work is listed in the bibliographical chapters of several of the early dynastic histories (the Han, Sui, and old and new Tang histories) there is no evidence of any detailed commentaries such as accompany the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Mozi as an Evolving Text: Different Voices in Early Chinese Thought ed. by Carine Defoort and Nicolas Standaert (review)

China Review International , Volume 20 (1) – Jan 22, 2013

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Abstract

Reviews 87 Carine Defoort and Nicolas Standaert, editors. The Mozi as an Evolving Text: Different Voices in Early Chinese Thought. Studies in the History of Chinese Texts, volume 4. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2013, 294 pp. Hardcover $166.00, isbn 978-90-04-23434-5. Mo Di (ca. 479­381 b.c.e.) has been a rather neglected figure in Chinese intellectual history over the more than two millennia since he and his followers offered the first significant philosophical challenge to developing Confucianism in their attempts to devise a workable social and political philosophy that would cure the ills of the Warring States period (475­221 b.c.e.). The neglect is reflected in the treatment of the eponymous work (the Mozi), which has, nevertheless, survived, albeit with significant textual difficulties in two of its five sections. The other three sections seem to have survived relatively well, although there are apparent losses of chapters and the inevitable uncertainties about the time and manner of composition and the actual author or authors/editors. Moreover, although the work is listed in the bibliographical chapters of several of the early dynastic histories (the Han, Sui, and old and new Tang histories) there is no evidence of any detailed commentaries such as accompany the

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 22, 2013

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