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The Mozi. A Complete Translation (review)

The Mozi. A Complete Translation (review) China Review International: Vol. 16, No. 4, 2009 phrase [p. 87] and gone straight to Bourdieu [The Field of Cultural Production, p. 31].) As such, while this book is well crafted as a stand-alone work, it also deserves to be read as part of the author's even more comprehensive scholarly engagement with global Shakespeares--Chinese, Asian, and otherwise. Huang has published extensively elsewhere on Shamlet (e.g., Asian Theatre Journal 22, no. 1), Liang Shiqiu and the sonnets (e.g., a chapter in Pfister and Gutsch's 2009 Shakespeare's Sonnets), and Hamlet during the Sino-Japanese War (a forthcoming book chapter). This book also complements several digitalization initiatives in which Huang has taken a leadership role, including Global Shakespeares.org and the MIT Shakespeare Electronic Archive. Overall, Huang has done a remarkable job of executing an ambitious agenda and navigating the numerous pitfalls attendant on serious interdisciplinary work. By focusing on localities, Huang develops a useful critical paradigm that sidesteps more conventional categories of the national and the ethnic. At the same time, the great efforts that Huang makes to justify Chinese Shakespeares as a legitimate field of inquiry suggest a lamentable persistence of Eurocentricism in the field of Shakespeare studies (to which I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Mozi. A Complete Translation (review)

China Review International , Volume 16 (4) – Jul 13, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

China Review International: Vol. 16, No. 4, 2009 phrase [p. 87] and gone straight to Bourdieu [The Field of Cultural Production, p. 31].) As such, while this book is well crafted as a stand-alone work, it also deserves to be read as part of the author's even more comprehensive scholarly engagement with global Shakespeares--Chinese, Asian, and otherwise. Huang has published extensively elsewhere on Shamlet (e.g., Asian Theatre Journal 22, no. 1), Liang Shiqiu and the sonnets (e.g., a chapter in Pfister and Gutsch's 2009 Shakespeare's Sonnets), and Hamlet during the Sino-Japanese War (a forthcoming book chapter). This book also complements several digitalization initiatives in which Huang has taken a leadership role, including Global Shakespeares.org and the MIT Shakespeare Electronic Archive. Overall, Huang has done a remarkable job of executing an ambitious agenda and navigating the numerous pitfalls attendant on serious interdisciplinary work. By focusing on localities, Huang develops a useful critical paradigm that sidesteps more conventional categories of the national and the ethnic. At the same time, the great efforts that Huang makes to justify Chinese Shakespeares as a legitimate field of inquiry suggest a lamentable persistence of Eurocentricism in the field of Shakespeare studies (to which I

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 13, 2009

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