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The Mountain Poems of Stonehouse

The Mountain Poems of Stonehouse RED PINE Bill Porter has been translating for thirty years under the name Red Pine. He was born in California and now lives in Washington State. Much of his interest is in classical Chinese poetry in the tradition of rivers-and-moun- tains (shan-shui) poetry. In 1983, he self-published The Mountain Poems of Stonehouse, a collec- tion of nearly two hundred poems by Shih-wu, the fourteenth-century (1272–1352) poet known as Stonehouse. Porter says, “He was one of the excep- tional Zen students who became a poet. Stonehouse had a genius for poetry that is unique. I’ve always said that he was the greatest of all the Chinese Buddhist poets. And although he was a hermit, he was a Zen teacher, too, and he taught individuals through his poetry.” On one of Porter’s many trips to China, he attempted to visit the place where Stonehouse had lived as a her- mit. He succeeded with the help of a military officer who got out his machete and personally led me through the undergrowth to an old farmhouse made of rocks on the mountain. He said, “This is where those poems were written. When we moved here it used to be a little Buddhist http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

The Mountain Poems of Stonehouse

Manoa , Volume 25 (1) – Jul 10, 2013

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x

Abstract

RED PINE Bill Porter has been translating for thirty years under the name Red Pine. He was born in California and now lives in Washington State. Much of his interest is in classical Chinese poetry in the tradition of rivers-and-moun- tains (shan-shui) poetry. In 1983, he self-published The Mountain Poems of Stonehouse, a collec- tion of nearly two hundred poems by Shih-wu, the fourteenth-century (1272–1352) poet known as Stonehouse. Porter says, “He was one of the excep- tional Zen students who became a poet. Stonehouse had a genius for poetry that is unique. I’ve always said that he was the greatest of all the Chinese Buddhist poets. And although he was a hermit, he was a Zen teacher, too, and he taught individuals through his poetry.” On one of Porter’s many trips to China, he attempted to visit the place where Stonehouse had lived as a her- mit. He succeeded with the help of a military officer who got out his machete and personally led me through the undergrowth to an old farmhouse made of rocks on the mountain. He said, “This is where those poems were written. When we moved here it used to be a little Buddhist

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 10, 2013

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