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The Moroccan Soul: French Education, Colonial Ethnology, and Muslim Resistance, 1912–1956 (review)

The Moroccan Soul: French Education, Colonial Ethnology, and Muslim Resistance, 1912–1956 (review) journal of world history, june 2011 The Moroccan Soul: French Education, Colonial Ethnology, and Muslim Resistance, 1912­1956. By spencer d. segalla. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2009. 344 pp. $55.00 (cloth). Spencer Segalla brings a postcolonial perspective to education in Morocco, having served as a teacher at the American School in Casablanca. In The Moroccan Soul, Segalla argues that the French colonizer imagined "Moroccanness as a static, natural, and neatly bounded identity" (p. ix), a product of the colonial philosophy of Hubert Lyautey, the first resident general of France in Morocco (1912­1925), the ethnologist Maurice Delafosse, the director of public education in Morocco Georges Hardy (1919 ­1926), and his successor and disciple Louis Brunot (1920 ­1939). Segalla suggests that Arabization programs created by Moroccan nationalists have unwittingly perpetuated aspects of this colonial construct; in 2001, he was surprised to hear Moroccans characterize his Moroccan students as "not really Moroccan" because "they spoke too much English or too much French" (p. x). Segalla offers the first comprehensive history of education in Morocco, an important contribution to the history of the French Protectorate and French colonial studies. When Lyautey undertook a Protectorate in 1912, France had abandoned the assimilation ideal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Moroccan Soul: French Education, Colonial Ethnology, and Muslim Resistance, 1912–1956 (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 22 (2) – Aug 3, 2011

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, june 2011 The Moroccan Soul: French Education, Colonial Ethnology, and Muslim Resistance, 1912­1956. By spencer d. segalla. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2009. 344 pp. $55.00 (cloth). Spencer Segalla brings a postcolonial perspective to education in Morocco, having served as a teacher at the American School in Casablanca. In The Moroccan Soul, Segalla argues that the French colonizer imagined "Moroccanness as a static, natural, and neatly bounded identity" (p. ix), a product of the colonial philosophy of Hubert Lyautey, the first resident general of France in Morocco (1912­1925), the ethnologist Maurice Delafosse, the director of public education in Morocco Georges Hardy (1919 ­1926), and his successor and disciple Louis Brunot (1920 ­1939). Segalla suggests that Arabization programs created by Moroccan nationalists have unwittingly perpetuated aspects of this colonial construct; in 2001, he was surprised to hear Moroccans characterize his Moroccan students as "not really Moroccan" because "they spoke too much English or too much French" (p. x). Segalla offers the first comprehensive history of education in Morocco, an important contribution to the history of the French Protectorate and French colonial studies. When Lyautey undertook a Protectorate in 1912, France had abandoned the assimilation ideal

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 3, 2011

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