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The Modern Girl around the World: Consumption, Modernity, and Globalization (review)

The Modern Girl around the World: Consumption, Modernity, and Globalization (review) but much less analyzed frontiers: the eastern front and the Ottoman Empire. Since the publication of the game-changing work by Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius, War Land on the Eastern Front (2000), First World War specialists have begun to lift their gaze from the overly trodden mud of the Somme to study the German military conquest and occupation of land and peoples that, when repeated one generation later, with the addition of the Holocaust, would become perhaps the most studied place in modern history. While all historians in any way conversant with World War One know of the shift of troops westward in the wake of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, Brose does an excellent job of describing just how much the western front changed in 1915 when Erich von Falkenhayn called off all attacks, dug two deep defensive lines, and sent massive numbers of troops eastward to help the German army find victory against the Slavs. By highlighting the successes of the Turks, Brose reminds us that one million British troops were assigned to the eastern Mediterranean theatre of war. Here, in both cases, the periphery was indeed influencing the center. robert nelson University of Windsor The Modern Girl around http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Modern Girl around the World: Consumption, Modernity, and Globalization (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 22 (2) – Aug 3, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-8050
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Abstract

but much less analyzed frontiers: the eastern front and the Ottoman Empire. Since the publication of the game-changing work by Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius, War Land on the Eastern Front (2000), First World War specialists have begun to lift their gaze from the overly trodden mud of the Somme to study the German military conquest and occupation of land and peoples that, when repeated one generation later, with the addition of the Holocaust, would become perhaps the most studied place in modern history. While all historians in any way conversant with World War One know of the shift of troops westward in the wake of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, Brose does an excellent job of describing just how much the western front changed in 1915 when Erich von Falkenhayn called off all attacks, dug two deep defensive lines, and sent massive numbers of troops eastward to help the German army find victory against the Slavs. By highlighting the successes of the Turks, Brose reminds us that one million British troops were assigned to the eastern Mediterranean theatre of war. Here, in both cases, the periphery was indeed influencing the center. robert nelson University of Windsor The Modern Girl around

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 3, 2011

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