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The Missing King by Moetai Brotherson (review)

The Missing King by Moetai Brotherson (review) book and media reviews drama in local and international arenas and help reinforce our appreciation of this body of work as a rich and dynamic component of contemporary world theater. Brotherson's novel was first published in French in 2007 as Le roi absent (Papeete: Au Vent des îles), and this 2012 English translation is by Jean Anderson, who brought fellow Tahitian author Chantal Spitz's Island of Shattered Dreams (2007) to anglophone readers. The language of The Missing King comes across as one of this translation's most engaging aspects; it is a testament to Anderson's range and dedication to the cultivation of Tahitian literature that these two novels are vastly different in tone and style. Indeed, with this author and translator, I was reminded of an interview with the father of contemporary Tahitian writers, poet and author Henri Hiro, whose literary provocation centered the place of writing in an age of vital renewal: "For this renewal to continue, Polynesians must write. . . . It doesn't matter what lan[Tahitian], French, or English. The important thing is that they write, that they do it! And I think that in a short while we will have Tahitian authors-- authors free of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Missing King by Moetai Brotherson (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 26 (1)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book and media reviews drama in local and international arenas and help reinforce our appreciation of this body of work as a rich and dynamic component of contemporary world theater. Brotherson's novel was first published in French in 2007 as Le roi absent (Papeete: Au Vent des îles), and this 2012 English translation is by Jean Anderson, who brought fellow Tahitian author Chantal Spitz's Island of Shattered Dreams (2007) to anglophone readers. The language of The Missing King comes across as one of this translation's most engaging aspects; it is a testament to Anderson's range and dedication to the cultivation of Tahitian literature that these two novels are vastly different in tone and style. Indeed, with this author and translator, I was reminded of an interview with the father of contemporary Tahitian writers, poet and author Henri Hiro, whose literary provocation centered the place of writing in an age of vital renewal: "For this renewal to continue, Polynesians must write. . . . It doesn't matter what lan[Tahitian], French, or English. The important thing is that they write, that they do it! And I think that in a short while we will have Tahitian authors-- authors free of

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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