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The Mirror, the Window, and the Telescope: How Renaissance Linear Perspective Changed Our Vision of the Universe (review)

The Mirror, the Window, and the Telescope: How Renaissance Linear Perspective Changed Our Vision... Book Reviews The Mirror, the Window, and the Telescope: How Renaissance Linear Perspective Changed Our Vision of the Universe. By samuel y. edgerton. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2009. 224 pp. $65.00 (cloth); $19.95 (paper). Samuel Edgerton's latest book refines and extends his argument about the importance of linear perspective for nothing less than the rise of modern science, the discovery of the New World, and the successful mission to the moon in 1969. He first emphasized the importance of linear perspective for the development of modern science more than thirty years ago in his The Renaissance Rediscovery of Linear Perspective (Basic Books, 1975), echoing a thesis that had been articulated by other art historians, including Erwin Panofsky and William Ivins. Although Edgerton himself has refined his thesis in books and articles over the past three decades, his most recent book was motivated by a "concern that the subject of perspective in the arts has fallen victim to a new wave of art criticism that no longer considers it a positive idea" (p. xiv). Edgerton argues that Filippo Brunelleschi demonstrated linear perspective within the deeply religious context of early fifteenth-century Florence. Brunelleschi's early paintings had a profound impact http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Mirror, the Window, and the Telescope: How Renaissance Linear Perspective Changed Our Vision of the Universe (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 22 (2) – Aug 3, 2011

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-8050
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Abstract

Book Reviews The Mirror, the Window, and the Telescope: How Renaissance Linear Perspective Changed Our Vision of the Universe. By samuel y. edgerton. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2009. 224 pp. $65.00 (cloth); $19.95 (paper). Samuel Edgerton's latest book refines and extends his argument about the importance of linear perspective for nothing less than the rise of modern science, the discovery of the New World, and the successful mission to the moon in 1969. He first emphasized the importance of linear perspective for the development of modern science more than thirty years ago in his The Renaissance Rediscovery of Linear Perspective (Basic Books, 1975), echoing a thesis that had been articulated by other art historians, including Erwin Panofsky and William Ivins. Although Edgerton himself has refined his thesis in books and articles over the past three decades, his most recent book was motivated by a "concern that the subject of perspective in the arts has fallen victim to a new wave of art criticism that no longer considers it a positive idea" (p. xiv). Edgerton argues that Filippo Brunelleschi demonstrated linear perspective within the deeply religious context of early fifteenth-century Florence. Brunelleschi's early paintings had a profound impact

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 3, 2011

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