Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Marsupials Strike Back: A Reply to Schapper (2011)

The Marsupials Strike Back: A Reply to Schapper (2011) Abstract: In a recent contribution to this journal, Antoinette Schapper has questioned the validity of two reconstructed marsupial terms that have been used as key pieces of evidence for a Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian subgroup of Austronesian languages. While she is correct in stating that reflexes of *mans(aə)r have been glossed erroneously as 'bandicoot' rather than 'cuscus' in a number of languages in eastern Indonesia, her corrections leave the subgrouping argument intact. Schapper's dismissal of Central Malayo-Polynesian evidence for *kandoRa is arbitrary, and her gloss of *mans(aə)r as 'cuscus' is no less problematic than the gloss 'bandicoot' proposed by Blust. These cognate sets for marsupials that span much of eastern Indonesia and the western Pacific thus remain as powerful evidence that the Austronesian languages of this region shared a period of common development apart from all other members of this family. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

The Marsupials Strike Back: A Reply to Schapper (2011)

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 51 (1) – Jun 30, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/the-marsupials-strike-back-a-reply-to-schapper-2011-ig9nc0wniL
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: In a recent contribution to this journal, Antoinette Schapper has questioned the validity of two reconstructed marsupial terms that have been used as key pieces of evidence for a Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian subgroup of Austronesian languages. While she is correct in stating that reflexes of *mans(aə)r have been glossed erroneously as 'bandicoot' rather than 'cuscus' in a number of languages in eastern Indonesia, her corrections leave the subgrouping argument intact. Schapper's dismissal of Central Malayo-Polynesian evidence for *kandoRa is arbitrary, and her gloss of *mans(aə)r as 'cuscus' is no less problematic than the gloss 'bandicoot' proposed by Blust. These cognate sets for marsupials that span much of eastern Indonesia and the western Pacific thus remain as powerful evidence that the Austronesian languages of this region shared a period of common development apart from all other members of this family.

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 30, 2012

There are no references for this article.