Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Man Who Saved Kabuki: Faubion Bowers and Theatre Censorship in Occupied Japan (review)

The Man Who Saved Kabuki: Faubion Bowers and Theatre Censorship in Occupied Japan (review) 364 Boo k R evie ws 1979)Ñwhere the manzai comedienne Tobosuke serves as a miko -like inter- mediary between the worlds of the living and the dead, offering salvation to the innocent Kanohara, who has been unjustly executed for war crimes he did not commitÑKagemi holds out the promise of salvation to Tomomori and the doomed Heike. She does so by manifesting a dimension of truth and solace that is beyond the tragic and impervious to the unforgiving force of the tides and history. KagemiÕs existence violates the tragic pattern of the play, but it is entirely consistent with KinoshitaÕs minwageki and with the spirit of The Tale of the Heike, which evolved as a requiem (chinkonka) for the Heike dead. Brian Powell and Jason Daniel are to be commended for their Þne translation of a major play from the shingeki repertory. Although PowellÕs introduction and the translations of the essays do not live up to the same high standard, this volume remains a valuable introduction to an essential moment in the evolution of modern Japanese drama. D av i d G . G o o d m a n University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign T H http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

The Man Who Saved Kabuki: Faubion Bowers and Theatre Censorship in Occupied Japan (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 19 (2) – Sep 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/the-man-who-saved-kabuki-faubion-bowers-and-theatre-censorship-in-scPiOwAX0C
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

364 Boo k R evie ws 1979)Ñwhere the manzai comedienne Tobosuke serves as a miko -like inter- mediary between the worlds of the living and the dead, offering salvation to the innocent Kanohara, who has been unjustly executed for war crimes he did not commitÑKagemi holds out the promise of salvation to Tomomori and the doomed Heike. She does so by manifesting a dimension of truth and solace that is beyond the tragic and impervious to the unforgiving force of the tides and history. KagemiÕs existence violates the tragic pattern of the play, but it is entirely consistent with KinoshitaÕs minwageki and with the spirit of The Tale of the Heike, which evolved as a requiem (chinkonka) for the Heike dead. Brian Powell and Jason Daniel are to be commended for their Þne translation of a major play from the shingeki repertory. Although PowellÕs introduction and the translations of the essays do not live up to the same high standard, this volume remains a valuable introduction to an essential moment in the evolution of modern Japanese drama. D av i d G . G o o d m a n University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign T H

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.