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The Making of Asmat Art: Indigenous Art in a World Perspective by Nick Stanley (review)

The Making of Asmat Art: Indigenous Art in a World Perspective by Nick Stanley (review) 220 the contemporary pacific • 29:1 (2017) be understood as being anticolonial Asmat artists carve their famous sculp- in a capitalist system that is based tures but instead suggests how the and premised on Native erasure? international art market creates what Since hula is now a global phenom- we know as “Asmat art.” With this enon, moreover, how do non–Native perspective, Stanley situates Asmat Hawaiian bodies function within this visual culture within a larger, interna- circuit of performance? tional context while at the same time Imada has clearly opened venues rooting these practices and interac- for new and exciting research, activ- tions in a longer history. ism, and dance in Hawaiian studies It is no surprise that Stanley is and American studies. This important interested in the notion of Asmat art book weaves archival, ethnographic, given his previous work that engages film, and personal memoirs to docu- with collecting, display, and depictions ment hula practitioners as part of hula of Asmat culture (Being Ourselves for networks that circulated throughout You: The Global Display of Cultures the United States and Europe. I com- [1998]; The Future of Indigenous mend her for challenging the popular Museums: Perspectives from the and state http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Making of Asmat Art: Indigenous Art in a World Perspective by Nick Stanley (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 29 (1) – Jan 21, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

220 the contemporary pacific • 29:1 (2017) be understood as being anticolonial Asmat artists carve their famous sculp- in a capitalist system that is based tures but instead suggests how the and premised on Native erasure? international art market creates what Since hula is now a global phenom- we know as “Asmat art.” With this enon, moreover, how do non–Native perspective, Stanley situates Asmat Hawaiian bodies function within this visual culture within a larger, interna- circuit of performance? tional context while at the same time Imada has clearly opened venues rooting these practices and interac- for new and exciting research, activ- tions in a longer history. ism, and dance in Hawaiian studies It is no surprise that Stanley is and American studies. This important interested in the notion of Asmat art book weaves archival, ethnographic, given his previous work that engages film, and personal memoirs to docu- with collecting, display, and depictions ment hula practitioners as part of hula of Asmat culture (Being Ourselves for networks that circulated throughout You: The Global Display of Cultures the United States and Europe. I com- [1998]; The Future of Indigenous mend her for challenging the popular Museums: Perspectives from the and state

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 21, 2017

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