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The Magical Body: Power, Fame, and Meaning in a Melanesian Society (review)

The Magical Body: Power, Fame, and Meaning in a Melanesian Society (review) the contemporary pacific · fall 2000 income, they perceive themselves as being in a state of famine or impending famine. There are various reasons for this perspective, and Eves traces and analyzes the different modalities. The conversion to Christianity has meant that most Lelet have abandoned magic, especially garden magic, which previously ensured the fecundity of their crops. With no ready substitute, Lelet are loath to assume a successful outcome for their productive activities. Colonialism and postcolonialism have created other changes as well; in particular the changing patterns of relations and exchange with the coastal tribes has altered the Lelet perception of selfsufficiency. The Lelet, who live in the inland plateau of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, are excellent gardeners and thus provide a good deal of taro to the coastal and urban populations of New Ireland. This is their main source of cash. They see the flow of taro to the coast, however, as a loss to themselves. Because taro is constantly leaving their community, the Lelet are at risk of famine. Flow and movement, including the flow of taro, are complex qualities for the Lelet. On the one hand, lightness, speed, and movement are highly desired http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Magical Body: Power, Fame, and Meaning in a Melanesian Society (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 12 (2) – Jul 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2000 income, they perceive themselves as being in a state of famine or impending famine. There are various reasons for this perspective, and Eves traces and analyzes the different modalities. The conversion to Christianity has meant that most Lelet have abandoned magic, especially garden magic, which previously ensured the fecundity of their crops. With no ready substitute, Lelet are loath to assume a successful outcome for their productive activities. Colonialism and postcolonialism have created other changes as well; in particular the changing patterns of relations and exchange with the coastal tribes has altered the Lelet perception of selfsufficiency. The Lelet, who live in the inland plateau of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, are excellent gardeners and thus provide a good deal of taro to the coastal and urban populations of New Ireland. This is their main source of cash. They see the flow of taro to the coast, however, as a loss to themselves. Because taro is constantly leaving their community, the Lelet are at risk of famine. Flow and movement, including the flow of taro, are complex qualities for the Lelet. On the one hand, lightness, speed, and movement are highly desired

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 1, 2000

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