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The Life and Death of an Artisan Community in Modern China

The Life and Death of an Artisan Community in Modern China Features Jacob Eyferth. Eating Rice from Bamboo Roots: The Social History of a Community of Handicraft Papermakers in Rural Sichuan, 1920­2000. Harvard East Asian Monographs 314. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009. 335 pp. 12 halftones, 2 maps, 3 tables, 12 illustrations. Hardcover $45.00, isbn 978-0-674-03288-0. This is a wonderful book. On one level, it is a finely and skillfully constructed history of a community of traditional artisans in rural China -- people whom modernizing states tend to consign to history's rubbish bin. Throughout the book, however, larger arguments related to the nature of revolution in twentieth-century China are firmly in the foreground. The study is innovative and bold; it sets new paradigms for research in the fields of modern China's rural and industrial history. The author did much of his fieldwork in the mid-1990s while based in Shiyan village, Jiajiang County, about 150 kilometers south of Sichuan's provincial capital, Chengdu. With a lot of help from local people, he has been able to construct a history that demonstrates the surprising resilience of a community of traditional craftspeople in the face of vigorous efforts by modernizing state builders to rationalize and standardize rural industry. Jacob Eyferth shows that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

The Life and Death of an Artisan Community in Modern China

China Review International , Volume 18 (4) – Jan 30, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

Features Jacob Eyferth. Eating Rice from Bamboo Roots: The Social History of a Community of Handicraft Papermakers in Rural Sichuan, 1920­2000. Harvard East Asian Monographs 314. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009. 335 pp. 12 halftones, 2 maps, 3 tables, 12 illustrations. Hardcover $45.00, isbn 978-0-674-03288-0. This is a wonderful book. On one level, it is a finely and skillfully constructed history of a community of traditional artisans in rural China -- people whom modernizing states tend to consign to history's rubbish bin. Throughout the book, however, larger arguments related to the nature of revolution in twentieth-century China are firmly in the foreground. The study is innovative and bold; it sets new paradigms for research in the fields of modern China's rural and industrial history. The author did much of his fieldwork in the mid-1990s while based in Shiyan village, Jiajiang County, about 150 kilometers south of Sichuan's provincial capital, Chengdu. With a lot of help from local people, he has been able to construct a history that demonstrates the surprising resilience of a community of traditional craftspeople in the face of vigorous efforts by modernizing state builders to rationalize and standardize rural industry. Jacob Eyferth shows that

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 30, 2011

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