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The Laughing One: Word Sketches from Klee Wyck

The Laughing One: Word Sketches from Klee Wyck E M I L Y C A R R Born in Victoria, British Columbia, in 1871, Emily Carr is well known in Canada. A university of art and design and an elementary school in Vancouver are named in her honor, as are a public library in Victoria, a middle school in Ottawa, and public schools in Ontario. Her many paintings of the landscape and First Nations cultures of British Columbia and Alaska-- influenced by the Post-Impressionists and Fauvists, whom she'd studied in Paris, New York, and elsewhere--are saturated with color. The keenness of her eye for nature and the way she renders shapes have been compared with the style of Georgia O'Keefe, whom she met. Carr was greatly encouraged by her association with the famous Group of Seven, Canadian landscape artists active in the 1920s and 1930s. When her poor health made it impossible to travel and paint anymore, she began writing. Her first book, Klee Wyck, was published in 1941, when she was sixty-nine, by Oxford University Press. The book is a collection of stories--she modestly referred to them as "sketches"--which she wrote in notebooks over a number of years. To Carr's surprise, Klee Wyck won the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

The Laughing One: Word Sketches from Klee Wyck

Manoa , Volume 25 (1) – Jul 10, 2013

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
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Abstract

E M I L Y C A R R Born in Victoria, British Columbia, in 1871, Emily Carr is well known in Canada. A university of art and design and an elementary school in Vancouver are named in her honor, as are a public library in Victoria, a middle school in Ottawa, and public schools in Ontario. Her many paintings of the landscape and First Nations cultures of British Columbia and Alaska-- influenced by the Post-Impressionists and Fauvists, whom she'd studied in Paris, New York, and elsewhere--are saturated with color. The keenness of her eye for nature and the way she renders shapes have been compared with the style of Georgia O'Keefe, whom she met. Carr was greatly encouraged by her association with the famous Group of Seven, Canadian landscape artists active in the 1920s and 1930s. When her poor health made it impossible to travel and paint anymore, she began writing. Her first book, Klee Wyck, was published in 1941, when she was sixty-nine, by Oxford University Press. The book is a collection of stories--she modestly referred to them as "sketches"--which she wrote in notebooks over a number of years. To Carr's surprise, Klee Wyck won the

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 10, 2013

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