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The languages and linguistics of the New Guinea area: A comprehensive guide ed. by Bill Palmer (review)

The languages and linguistics of the New Guinea area: A comprehensive guide ed. by Bill Palmer... 430 OCEANIC LINGUISTICS, VOL. 58, NO. 2 conundrum. Do we teach the techniques that are in essence the same as those from classic books from the 1970s? How do we teach the relationship between internal reconstruction and synchronic morphophonological alternations, when a “morphology” class may well mean Distributed Morphology (and morpho- syntax), and when synchronic morphophonological alternations are modeled in Optimality Theory and students neither are familiar with rule-based repre- sentations nor see the complex relationships between synchrony and diach- rony? If students will be taking only one class in language change, what do we want (and need) for them to take from that class? These are bigger questions than a single review can address. As useful as Blust’s book is for teaching the principles of sound change, reconstruction, and subgrouping, that cannot be the extent of a course. The book, with its numerous problem sets, will best serve a historical linguistics course as a complement to other material. Since historical research is increasingly quantitative, and since historical linguistics has impor- tant connections to both the cognitive science of language and other fields that investigate the past (e.g., archaeology and genetics), we strongly feel that stu- dents need to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

The languages and linguistics of the New Guinea area: A comprehensive guide ed. by Bill Palmer (review)

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 58 (2) – Mar 11, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421

Abstract

430 OCEANIC LINGUISTICS, VOL. 58, NO. 2 conundrum. Do we teach the techniques that are in essence the same as those from classic books from the 1970s? How do we teach the relationship between internal reconstruction and synchronic morphophonological alternations, when a “morphology” class may well mean Distributed Morphology (and morpho- syntax), and when synchronic morphophonological alternations are modeled in Optimality Theory and students neither are familiar with rule-based repre- sentations nor see the complex relationships between synchrony and diach- rony? If students will be taking only one class in language change, what do we want (and need) for them to take from that class? These are bigger questions than a single review can address. As useful as Blust’s book is for teaching the principles of sound change, reconstruction, and subgrouping, that cannot be the extent of a course. The book, with its numerous problem sets, will best serve a historical linguistics course as a complement to other material. Since historical research is increasingly quantitative, and since historical linguistics has impor- tant connections to both the cognitive science of language and other fields that investigate the past (e.g., archaeology and genetics), we strongly feel that stu- dents need to

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 11, 2020

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