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The Land of Eb by John Hill and Andrew Williamson (review)

The Land of Eb by John Hill and Andrew Williamson (review) book and media reviews The movie ends with the 2012 change of government in Papua New Guinea and with the suggestion that the pro-industry bias will begin to shift in favor of landowners and balance the playing field, to some extent at least. It also ends with a threat of violence akin to the resistance that took place over environmental impacts of a huge copper mine in Bougainville (1988­1997). The movie thus ends with the suggestion that in the dialogue between global capitalism and local-level resource owners, at least for the moment in this one setting, the forces of global capital will not simply be free to have the last word. As I said at the outset, one would like to hope that this absorbing documentary portrays a dialogical relationship in this Bakhtinian sense between local community members, distant markets, transnational capital, and national and international political regimes. But somehow one does not feel too confident that this open-ended, egalitarian kind of dialogue can or will be sustained in the long run. Canning Paradise is a tremendous achievement for which I congratulate its producer/director/writer, Olivier Pollet. The only problem I have with it lies in its ninety-minute length, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Land of Eb by John Hill and Andrew Williamson (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 26 (1) – Mar 12, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews The movie ends with the 2012 change of government in Papua New Guinea and with the suggestion that the pro-industry bias will begin to shift in favor of landowners and balance the playing field, to some extent at least. It also ends with a threat of violence akin to the resistance that took place over environmental impacts of a huge copper mine in Bougainville (1988­1997). The movie thus ends with the suggestion that in the dialogue between global capitalism and local-level resource owners, at least for the moment in this one setting, the forces of global capital will not simply be free to have the last word. As I said at the outset, one would like to hope that this absorbing documentary portrays a dialogical relationship in this Bakhtinian sense between local community members, distant markets, transnational capital, and national and international political regimes. But somehow one does not feel too confident that this open-ended, egalitarian kind of dialogue can or will be sustained in the long run. Canning Paradise is a tremendous achievement for which I congratulate its producer/director/writer, Olivier Pollet. The only problem I have with it lies in its ninety-minute length,

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 12, 2014

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