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The Jews as a Chosen People: Tradition and Transformation (review)

The Jews as a Chosen People: Tradition and Transformation (review) Confucian scholarship. Bringing the classical Confucian texts into dialogue with Rorty's neo-pragmatism allows them to be read with new meaning, makes more striking what is absent from their discourse, and illustrates problems in Rorty's approach -- particularly the relation between self and community. But the volume also does something else. It makes the reader confront the fact that, on a wide range of fundamental interpretive issues -- such as the nature of religiousness and the tension between tradition and innovation -- there are striking and deep disagreements within contemporary Confucian scholarship. In a conventionalist approach to truth, this might be a disquieting state of affairs. Yet Rorty would presumably be delighted if his work has helped to bring out such disagreements. After all, for Rorty, "[w]ithout such specialists in dissonance -- people who think that everything is getting too damned harmonious -- intellectual and moral progress would slow to a halt" (p. 295). From the "eruption of novelty" found in this volume, better ways of describing ourselves might arise. The Jews as a Chosen People: Tradition and Transformation. By S. Leyla Gürkan. Routledge Jewish Studies Series. London and New York: Routledge, 2009. Pp. xiv + 246. Reviewed by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

The Jews as a Chosen People: Tradition and Transformation (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 62 (1) – Jan 1, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
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Abstract

Confucian scholarship. Bringing the classical Confucian texts into dialogue with Rorty's neo-pragmatism allows them to be read with new meaning, makes more striking what is absent from their discourse, and illustrates problems in Rorty's approach -- particularly the relation between self and community. But the volume also does something else. It makes the reader confront the fact that, on a wide range of fundamental interpretive issues -- such as the nature of religiousness and the tension between tradition and innovation -- there are striking and deep disagreements within contemporary Confucian scholarship. In a conventionalist approach to truth, this might be a disquieting state of affairs. Yet Rorty would presumably be delighted if his work has helped to bring out such disagreements. After all, for Rorty, "[w]ithout such specialists in dissonance -- people who think that everything is getting too damned harmonious -- intellectual and moral progress would slow to a halt" (p. 295). From the "eruption of novelty" found in this volume, better ways of describing ourselves might arise. The Jews as a Chosen People: Tradition and Transformation. By S. Leyla Gürkan. Routledge Jewish Studies Series. London and New York: Routledge, 2009. Pp. xiv + 246. Reviewed by

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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