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The Jewish Century (review)

The Jewish Century (review) 3JWH_339-352 7/8/06 2:08 PM Page 347 Book Reviews 347 of an impetus to future researchers in areas of transnational history than a fault with the volume per se. For instance, the question of rup- ture or continuity between the modern and early modern is a contin- uing debate. This book illuminates how that debate remains a relevant one in the field of gender studies as well. Let me close this review by mentioning one last question that the collection left me with, one that has to do with the relationship between settler and nonsettler colonial societies. When reading the individual contributions, there are moments one has a sense that the differences between these two colonial situations was probably insignif- icant. One is left with the impression that the experience of colonial India parallels that of native America or aboriginal Australia. Draw- ing attention to these similarities is welcome, but did the degree of ignominy and racism heaped on Packsaddle really compare with that of those Indians left out of British clubs? To put it slightly differently, there were some colonial situations where the native body was always under the threat of total evisceration. There were some others where, despite http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Jewish Century (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 17 (3) – Aug 22, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

3JWH_339-352 7/8/06 2:08 PM Page 347 Book Reviews 347 of an impetus to future researchers in areas of transnational history than a fault with the volume per se. For instance, the question of rup- ture or continuity between the modern and early modern is a contin- uing debate. This book illuminates how that debate remains a relevant one in the field of gender studies as well. Let me close this review by mentioning one last question that the collection left me with, one that has to do with the relationship between settler and nonsettler colonial societies. When reading the individual contributions, there are moments one has a sense that the differences between these two colonial situations was probably insignif- icant. One is left with the impression that the experience of colonial India parallels that of native America or aboriginal Australia. Draw- ing attention to these similarities is welcome, but did the degree of ignominy and racism heaped on Packsaddle really compare with that of those Indians left out of British clubs? To put it slightly differently, there were some colonial situations where the native body was always under the threat of total evisceration. There were some others where, despite

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 22, 2006

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