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The Intimate Life of L. M. Montgomery (review)

The Intimate Life of L. M. Montgomery (review) 05-Reviews 12/5/05 9:33 AM Page 690 690 Biography 28.4 (Fall 2005) transition that scholars have seen emerging during the turn of the century. In this way, Lee serves as a pivotal figure in this volume in the formulation of a modernist authorial identity. An essay on Virginia Woolf appropriately ends the discussion of mod- ernism and authorial identity. Molly Hite starts with the counterfactual ques- tion of why Woolf in her search for literary foremothers did not look to writer Elizabeth Robins for inspiration. Woolf, Hite claims, cast herself as separate and distinct from successful women around her such as Robins, and instead chose to identify with well-known male writers. By connecting the ideas of Robins with those Hite claims were later expressed more eloquently by Woolf, this essay makes the final case for the nineteenth-century roots of modernism. Chapter ten concludes by arguing that it was Woolf ’s physical vulnerability as a woman that led her to assume the identity of male genius rather than identify with women like Robins. Overall, this approach to intellectual biography provides a new lens through which to view the lives of writers connected directly and tangen- tially to the modernist movement. Future http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

The Intimate Life of L. M. Montgomery (review)

Biography , Volume 28 (4) – Jan 9, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

05-Reviews 12/5/05 9:33 AM Page 690 690 Biography 28.4 (Fall 2005) transition that scholars have seen emerging during the turn of the century. In this way, Lee serves as a pivotal figure in this volume in the formulation of a modernist authorial identity. An essay on Virginia Woolf appropriately ends the discussion of mod- ernism and authorial identity. Molly Hite starts with the counterfactual ques- tion of why Woolf in her search for literary foremothers did not look to writer Elizabeth Robins for inspiration. Woolf, Hite claims, cast herself as separate and distinct from successful women around her such as Robins, and instead chose to identify with well-known male writers. By connecting the ideas of Robins with those Hite claims were later expressed more eloquently by Woolf, this essay makes the final case for the nineteenth-century roots of modernism. Chapter ten concludes by arguing that it was Woolf ’s physical vulnerability as a woman that led her to assume the identity of male genius rather than identify with women like Robins. Overall, this approach to intellectual biography provides a new lens through which to view the lives of writers connected directly and tangen- tially to the modernist movement. Future

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 9, 2006

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