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The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire (review)

The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire (review) book and media reviews ferent arms of the state. Hassall argues that "instability in the structure of the executive branch of government is one of the main threats to the security of Vanuatu's system of government" (242). While kastom (custom) provides a degree of stability in society, the fit--or lack of it--between modern and traditional authorities could cause conflicts. Lopeti Senituli discusses the demands for democratic reform that have been occurring in the Kingdom of Tonga. He asserts that changes are inevitable, and arise from within (in what he describes as the monarch's "road to Damascus" conversion), rather than from outside. He states, "Tonga is managing this inherently tricky transition by drawing on its own values and institutions" (284). The violent riot in Nuku`alofa in November 2006 happened after the chapter was written, and was therefore not featured in the discussions. Today, international intervention to address intrastate conflicts is an important aspect on security and development in the region. Clive Moore discusses the experiences of the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands (ramsi), which intervened to rebuild the state, establish order, and facilitate public sector reforms. The region also offers examples of reconciliations. Nic Maclellan discusses the reconciliation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 21 (1) – Feb 11, 2008

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews ferent arms of the state. Hassall argues that "instability in the structure of the executive branch of government is one of the main threats to the security of Vanuatu's system of government" (242). While kastom (custom) provides a degree of stability in society, the fit--or lack of it--between modern and traditional authorities could cause conflicts. Lopeti Senituli discusses the demands for democratic reform that have been occurring in the Kingdom of Tonga. He asserts that changes are inevitable, and arise from within (in what he describes as the monarch's "road to Damascus" conversion), rather than from outside. He states, "Tonga is managing this inherently tricky transition by drawing on its own values and institutions" (284). The violent riot in Nuku`alofa in November 2006 happened after the chapter was written, and was therefore not featured in the discussions. Today, international intervention to address intrastate conflicts is an important aspect on security and development in the region. Clive Moore discusses the experiences of the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands (ramsi), which intervened to rebuild the state, establish order, and facilitate public sector reforms. The region also offers examples of reconciliations. Nic Maclellan discusses the reconciliation

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 11, 2008

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