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The Images We Produce: Ka'ililauokekoa

The Images We Produce: Ka'ililauokekoa book and media reviews script worked against that. Directing a diverse, accomplished group of Hawai`i actors (none Rotuman), Megan Evans used the Kumu Kahua space effectively, making good theater of the play. Yet the performance lacked the "Pacific feel" of Hereniko's Last Virgin and Fine Dancing in both of which dance, music, chant, clowning, and aspects of Pacific performance were vital components. This production of Love 3 Times, and to some extent the script, moved toward performing generalizable features of contemporary fragmentation. Or as Evans phrased it in her program notes, "Now we live more and more like branches of an urban banyan tree--our roots dangling in the air." The danger of this approach in (and to) the play is that it will be haunted by the bad faith of becoming an instance of the phenomena that trouble it, rather than art genuinely haunted and passionately driven to envision alternatives. language. Hawaiian was being spoken by eager children and animated adults looking for their seats; the audience was abuzz with excitement. Outside, the stars of the film were taking still photos alongside their film poster. This was a historic moment for film in Hawai`i-- the debut of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

The Images We Produce: Ka'ililauokekoa

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 14 (2) – Jan 7, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book and media reviews script worked against that. Directing a diverse, accomplished group of Hawai`i actors (none Rotuman), Megan Evans used the Kumu Kahua space effectively, making good theater of the play. Yet the performance lacked the "Pacific feel" of Hereniko's Last Virgin and Fine Dancing in both of which dance, music, chant, clowning, and aspects of Pacific performance were vital components. This production of Love 3 Times, and to some extent the script, moved toward performing generalizable features of contemporary fragmentation. Or as Evans phrased it in her program notes, "Now we live more and more like branches of an urban banyan tree--our roots dangling in the air." The danger of this approach in (and to) the play is that it will be haunted by the bad faith of becoming an instance of the phenomena that trouble it, rather than art genuinely haunted and passionately driven to envision alternatives. language. Hawaiian was being spoken by eager children and animated adults looking for their seats; the audience was abuzz with excitement. Outside, the stars of the film were taking still photos alongside their film poster. This was a historic moment for film in Hawai`i-- the debut of the

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 7, 2002

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