The <i>Palo-Palo</i> in Batanes, Philippines: From Colonial Legacy to Performance of Solidarity

The Palo-Palo in Batanes, Philippines: From Colonial Legacy to Performance of Solidarity <p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay is a preliminary discussion of the <i>palo-palo</i>, a cultural performance of the Ivatan community in the Batanes group of islands in northernmost Philippines where performers strike "opponents&apos;s" sticks to reenact a battle of two opposing camps. The first part is a descriptive narrative of the <i>palo-palo</i> performance. The second part is a preliminary analysis and theorization of the <i>palo-palo</i>&apos;s origin by arguing that the performance could have been based on and/or inspired by the <i>komedya</i>, a Philippine traditional theatre form introduced by the Spaniards during colonization which has roots in the socio-historical conflict of the Christians and the Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula in Southwest Europe. Generally, the localization of the form is argued to be paradoxically an embrace and repudiation of the foreign.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

The <i>Palo-Palo</i> in Batanes, Philippines: From Colonial Legacy to Performance of Solidarity

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay is a preliminary discussion of the <i>palo-palo</i>, a cultural performance of the Ivatan community in the Batanes group of islands in northernmost Philippines where performers strike "opponents&apos;s" sticks to reenact a battle of two opposing camps. The first part is a descriptive narrative of the <i>palo-palo</i> performance. The second part is a preliminary analysis and theorization of the <i>palo-palo</i>&apos;s origin by arguing that the performance could have been based on and/or inspired by the <i>komedya</i>, a Philippine traditional theatre form introduced by the Spaniards during colonization which has roots in the socio-historical conflict of the Christians and the Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula in Southwest Europe. Generally, the localization of the form is argued to be paradoxically an embrace and repudiation of the foreign.</p>

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 5, 2018

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