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The Human Tradition in Modern Japan (review)

The Human Tradition in Modern Japan (review) Book Reviews ignoble savagery that counterpointed the development of the Noble Savage myth, the sense of a genuine dialectic between discourses of nobility and ignobility (established, for instance, in the work of Bernard Smith) is missing here. The ways in which the phenomenon of Europeans "going native" nuanced or inverted popular understandings of Noble Savagery might also have been productively explored. Yet by scrupulously following his own particular trail through a wealth of textual evidence, Ellingson has made an important contribution to the history of anthropology, and to the deconstruction of what he shows to be one of its founding myths. vanessa smith University of Sydney The Human Tradition in Modern Japan. Edited by anne walthall. Wilmington: Scholarly Resources Books, 2002. Pp. xx + 241. $60.00 (cloth); $19.95 (paper). The Human Tradition in Modern Japan is a fascinating work that unearths the lives of twelve diverse men and women who lived in Japan between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries. Though these people are not as "ordinary" as Anne Walthall's introduction leads one to believe--princesses, samurai, Diet members, lesbian writers, and iconic entertainers are not ordinary--they are, nevertheless, not makers of history so much as humans dealing with life's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Human Tradition in Modern Japan (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 15 (1) – Feb 11, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews ignoble savagery that counterpointed the development of the Noble Savage myth, the sense of a genuine dialectic between discourses of nobility and ignobility (established, for instance, in the work of Bernard Smith) is missing here. The ways in which the phenomenon of Europeans "going native" nuanced or inverted popular understandings of Noble Savagery might also have been productively explored. Yet by scrupulously following his own particular trail through a wealth of textual evidence, Ellingson has made an important contribution to the history of anthropology, and to the deconstruction of what he shows to be one of its founding myths. vanessa smith University of Sydney The Human Tradition in Modern Japan. Edited by anne walthall. Wilmington: Scholarly Resources Books, 2002. Pp. xx + 241. $60.00 (cloth); $19.95 (paper). The Human Tradition in Modern Japan is a fascinating work that unearths the lives of twelve diverse men and women who lived in Japan between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries. Though these people are not as "ordinary" as Anne Walthall's introduction leads one to believe--princesses, samurai, Diet members, lesbian writers, and iconic entertainers are not ordinary--they are, nevertheless, not makers of history so much as humans dealing with life's

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 11, 2004

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