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The Great War: An Imperial History (review)

The Great War: An Imperial History (review) journal of world history, march 2005 history and writing inevitably undermine "the counter-hegemomic tendencies" of Indian folklore and oral traditions (p. 288). The rest of the essays explore cultural, often national, traditions or limitations in the writing of world history. The most useful of these for world historians is probably Lutz Raphael's essay on Henri Berr, the French propensity for multivolume universal histories, the comparative work of the French Annales school, and Fernand Braudel. The choice of scholars who are largely specialists in national histories and cultures for so many of the essays creates some repetitions, imbalances, and slow spots. The essays on Russia and China separately grapple with the Marxist paradigm, for instance. In some cases, where there is little or no tradition of world history writing, the authors variously attempt to explain why, fill in the gap, or discuss cultural ideas of others. Two essays, for example, discuss Japanese relations with and attitudes toward the rest of the world, rather than Japanese world history. Further, the German-English sponsorship of the conference leads to some odd choices. The volume co-editor, Benedikt Stuchtey, contributes a long essay on German historiography of the British empire, 1885­1945. And Michael Bentley http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Great War: An Imperial History (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 16 (1)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

journal of world history, march 2005 history and writing inevitably undermine "the counter-hegemomic tendencies" of Indian folklore and oral traditions (p. 288). The rest of the essays explore cultural, often national, traditions or limitations in the writing of world history. The most useful of these for world historians is probably Lutz Raphael's essay on Henri Berr, the French propensity for multivolume universal histories, the comparative work of the French Annales school, and Fernand Braudel. The choice of scholars who are largely specialists in national histories and cultures for so many of the essays creates some repetitions, imbalances, and slow spots. The essays on Russia and China separately grapple with the Marxist paradigm, for instance. In some cases, where there is little or no tradition of world history writing, the authors variously attempt to explain why, fill in the gap, or discuss cultural ideas of others. Two essays, for example, discuss Japanese relations with and attitudes toward the rest of the world, rather than Japanese world history. Further, the German-English sponsorship of the conference leads to some odd choices. The volume co-editor, Benedikt Stuchtey, contributes a long essay on German historiography of the British empire, 1885­1945. And Michael Bentley

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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