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The Great Land Rush and the Making of the Modern World, 1650-1900 (review)

The Great Land Rush and the Making of the Modern World, 1650-1900 (review) 3JWH_339-352 7/8/06 2:08 PM Page 342 342 journal of world history, september 2006 nations and nature, but some Britons feared that excessive imperial extension would corrupt traditional culture at home. If Britons were somewhat wary about empire, John Crowley shows that they grew a voracious appetite for the empire’s visual representation in the latter half of the eighteenth century. As travelers and military officers moved throughout the Atlantic, they painted topographic landscapes that attempted to lasso Britain’s faraway lands into the imagined commu- nity of the Isles. Finally, Karin Wulf ’s work on the genealogical diary of a Deborah Norris Logan, a Pennsylvania Quaker, demonstrates the continued importance of family lineage and transatlantic identities even after the Revolution. Logan’s diary confirmed her family’s pater- nal treatment of slaves while simultaneously displaying its central role in the founding of Pennsylvania, the American Revolution, and the establishment of a new American nation. Wulf ’s piece speaks to one woman’s production of history, memory, and identity during a period of profound imperial, national, and personal crisis. This volume would be useful in a graduate seminar in early Amer- ican history and indispensable in one on Atlantic history. Though there are a few http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

The Great Land Rush and the Making of the Modern World, 1650-1900 (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 17 (3) – Aug 22, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

3JWH_339-352 7/8/06 2:08 PM Page 342 342 journal of world history, september 2006 nations and nature, but some Britons feared that excessive imperial extension would corrupt traditional culture at home. If Britons were somewhat wary about empire, John Crowley shows that they grew a voracious appetite for the empire’s visual representation in the latter half of the eighteenth century. As travelers and military officers moved throughout the Atlantic, they painted topographic landscapes that attempted to lasso Britain’s faraway lands into the imagined commu- nity of the Isles. Finally, Karin Wulf ’s work on the genealogical diary of a Deborah Norris Logan, a Pennsylvania Quaker, demonstrates the continued importance of family lineage and transatlantic identities even after the Revolution. Logan’s diary confirmed her family’s pater- nal treatment of slaves while simultaneously displaying its central role in the founding of Pennsylvania, the American Revolution, and the establishment of a new American nation. Wulf ’s piece speaks to one woman’s production of history, memory, and identity during a period of profound imperial, national, and personal crisis. This volume would be useful in a graduate seminar in early Amer- ican history and indispensable in one on Atlantic history. Though there are a few

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 22, 2006

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