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The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory (review)

The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory (review) 170 BOOK R EV IEWS welcomed them and provided a supportive environment in which they practiced their Christian spirituality. Buddhism itself became a way for these Christians to think about their own faith and live it out in new ways. According to Harris, and also according to Cornille’s strict definition, this is not an example of multiple reli- gious belonging. Pieris and Rodrigo, however, do offer us examples of what I have called “interreligious friendship.” Many examples of interreligious friendships come to mind: Thomas Merton and D. T. Suzuki, Gustave Weigel and Abraham Heschel, Rita Gross and Rosemary Radford Reuther, Masao Abe and Christian theologians such as John B. Cobb and Don Mitchell. Many more names could be added to this list. None of these religious practitioners would claim to belong to more than one religion. All of them would readily admit that their interreligious friendship has been enriching. I would take this one step further. In these friendships, our religious practices are not only enriched, but religious communities enjoy a new kind of sol- idarity with one another. With John Cobb, I believe that multiple religious belong- ing will not become widely practiced by Christians. Interreligious friendships— friendships http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 25 – Oct 10, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472

Abstract

170 BOOK R EV IEWS welcomed them and provided a supportive environment in which they practiced their Christian spirituality. Buddhism itself became a way for these Christians to think about their own faith and live it out in new ways. According to Harris, and also according to Cornille’s strict definition, this is not an example of multiple reli- gious belonging. Pieris and Rodrigo, however, do offer us examples of what I have called “interreligious friendship.” Many examples of interreligious friendships come to mind: Thomas Merton and D. T. Suzuki, Gustave Weigel and Abraham Heschel, Rita Gross and Rosemary Radford Reuther, Masao Abe and Christian theologians such as John B. Cobb and Don Mitchell. Many more names could be added to this list. None of these religious practitioners would claim to belong to more than one religion. All of them would readily admit that their interreligious friendship has been enriching. I would take this one step further. In these friendships, our religious practices are not only enriched, but religious communities enjoy a new kind of sol- idarity with one another. With John Cobb, I believe that multiple religious belong- ing will not become widely practiced by Christians. Interreligious friendships— friendships

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2005

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